Farm Forum https://www.farmforum.net The Green Sheet: Where we grow. Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:56:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 Crop Progress and Pasture Conditions https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/crop-progress-and-pasture-conditions-125/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:56:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18984673 U.S. Department of Agriculture

South Dakota

SIOUX FALLS – For the week ending September 17, 2017, producers continued cutting silage and seeding winter wheat under warm, dry weather, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Temperatures were well above average for mid-September as afternoon highs warmed to the 80s and 90s in many locations early in the week. Cooler temperatures returned by week’s end along with showers and thunderstorms across western and east central South Dakota. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 22 percent very short, 26 short, 51 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 29 percent very short, 34 short, 37 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 12 percent very poor, 16 poor, 32 fair, 36 good, and 4 excellent. Corn dented was 77 percent, behind 88 last year and 89 for the five-year average. Corn mature was 14 percent, well behind 38 both last year and average.

Soybean condition rated 6 percent very poor, 13 poor, 35 fair, 40 good, and 6 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 49 percent, behind 64 last year and 63 average.

Sorghum condition rated 9 percent very poor, 20 poor, 54 fair, 17 good, and 0 excellent. Sorghum coloring was 73 percent, behind 91 last year and 90 average. Mature was 17 percent, well behind 44 last year, and behind 31 average.

Sunflower condition rated 8 percent very poor, 21 poor, 45 fair, 24 good, and 2 excellent. Sunflowers ray flowers dried was 71 percent, ahead of 60 last year, but behind 77 average. Bracts turning yellow was 35 percent, ahead of 27 last year, but behind 47 average. Bracts turning brown was 10 percent.

Alfalfa condition rated 31 percent very poor, 32 poor, 20 fair, 16 good, and 1 excellent. Alfalfa second cutting was 88 percent complete, behind 94 last year. Third cutting was 61 percent, behind 68 last year and 76 average.

Barley harvested was 96 percent.

Winter wheat planted was 30 percent, ahead of 18 last year and 24 average. Emerged was 1 percent, equal to both last year and average.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range condition rated 31 percent very poor, 27 poor, 27 fair, 15 good, and 0 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 23 percent very short, 33 short, 43 adequate, and 1 surplus.

North Dakota

FARGO, N.D. – For the week ending September 17, 2017, much needed precipitation was received over much of the State, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Moisture amounts ranged from over an inch in the western part of the State to a quarter of an inch in the east. The moisture halted or delayed most harvest activities, but was welcomed by producers. Temperatures averaged two degrees below normal in the western part of the State, but two to six degrees above normal in the east. There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 13 percent very short, 31 short, 55 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 18 percent very short, 36 short, 45 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 5 percent very poor, 11 poor, 33 fair, 45 good, and 6 excellent. Corn dough was 98 percent, near 100 last year, and equal to the five-year average. Dented was 77 percent, behind 86 last year and 83 average. Mature was 17 percent, well behind 38 last year, and behind 32 average.

Soybean condition rated 5 percent very poor, 12 poor, 35 fair, 44 good, and 4 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 73 percent, near 71 last year and 72 average. Harvested was 2 percent, equal to last year, but behind 8 average.

Winter wheat planted was 33 percent, near 32 last year. Emerged was 2 percent.

Spring wheat harvested was 97 percent, near 98 last year, but ahead of 91 average.

Oats harvested was 96 percent, near 100 last year and 95 average.

Sunflowers condition rated 8 percent very poor, 13 poor, 44 fair, 34 good, and 1 excellent. Sunflower ray flowers dried was 93 percent, near 89 last year, and ahead of 88 average. Bracts turning yellow was 77 percent, near 73 last year, and ahead of 59 average. Bracts turning brown was 32 percent, near 31 last year.

Dry edible beans condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 28 fair, 49 good, and 7 excellent. Dry edible beans dropping leaves was 96 percent, near 92 last year and 93 average. Harvested was 44 percent near 41 last year and 46 average.

Durum wheat harvested was 95 percent, ahead of 84 last year and 77 average.

Canola harvested was 91 percent, near 88 last year, and ahead of 85 average.

Flaxseed harvested was 87 percent, near 84 last year, and ahead of 68 average.

Potato condition rated 4 percent very poor, 13 poor, 27 fair, 51 good, and 5 excellent. Potatoes vines dry was 81 percent, near 82 last year, but ahead of 72 average. Harvested was 28 percent, ahead of 14 last year and 18 average.

Alfalfa second cutting was 97 percent complete, near 94 last year.

Sugarbeet condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 5 fair, 27 good, and 67 excellent. Sugarbeets harvested was 9 percent, equal to last year, and near 10 average.

Lentils harvested was 94 percent, near 91 last year.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 28 percent very poor, 30 poor, 32 fair, 10 good, and 0 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 19 percent very short, 34 short, 46 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Minnesota

Warm conditions aided maturity of corn and soybeans and contributed to a rapid harvest pace of dry edible beans during the week ending September 17, 2017, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Some areas reported fall tillage delays due to dry conditions. Harvest continued for corn silage, sugarbeets, potatoes, and alfalfa hay.

Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short, 16 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 4 percent very short, 15 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus.

Eighty-six percent of the corn for grain crop reached the dent stage, remaining 5 days behind the 5-year average. Thirteen percent had reached maturity, 10 days behind both last year and average. Corn for silage was 30 percent complete, 11 days behind average. Corn condition was 81 percent good to excellent. Eighty-one percent of the soybean crop was turning color with 36 percent dropping leaves. Scattered reports of soybean harvesting were noted in northern Minnesota. Soybean condition remained at 72 percent good to excellent.

Nearly all of the dry edible bean crop was dropping leaves. One-quarter of the dry edible crop was harvested during the week, making the total harvest progress 44 percent complete. Dry edible bean condition rating was 66 percent good to excellent. Sunflower condition remained at 86 percent good to excellent. Potato harvest was 48 percent complete. Potato crop condition remained at 92 percent good to excellent. Sugarbeets were 8 percent lifted. Sugarbeet condition was unchanged at 89 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 87 percent complete. Pasture condition declined to 54 percent good to excellent.

Iowa

It was mostly dry in Iowa with above normal temperatures for the week ending September 17, 2017, according to USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork. With increased heat and little moisture, crops matured rapidly in the past week. Activities for the week included seeding cover crops, spreading manure, harvesting seed corn, chopping corn silage, and hauling grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 21 percent very short, 30 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 0 percent surplus. According to the September 12, 2017 U.S. Drought Monitor, parts of south central and southeast Iowa remain in extreme drought status. Subsoil moisture levels rated 20 percent very short, 34 percent short, 46 percent adequate and 0 percent surplus.

Eighty-eight percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage or beyond, eight days behind last year and three days behind the 5-year average. Thirty percent of corn had reached maturity, six days behind last year and average. Reports were received from throughout the state that corn harvest for grain has begun. Corn condition declined slightly to 59 percent good to excellent. Seventy-four percent soybeans were turning color or beyond, two days behind last year but one day ahead of average. Thirty-one percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, one day behind average. Scattered soybean fields across most of the state have been harvested. Soybean condition dropped to 58 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay is nearly complete at 96 percent. Pasture conditions worsened over the past week with 47 percent poor to very poor. Livestock conditions remain good, although there were scattered reports of flies and pink eye being an issue.

Nebraska

LINCOLN, Neb. – For the week ending September 17, 2017, temperatures averaged four to eight degrees above normal, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Precipitation ranged from half an inch to an inch across a majority of the State. Dry edible bean harvest was underway in western counties. There were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 10 percent very short, 33 short, 56 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 11 percent very short, 36 short, 52 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 5 percent very poor, 9 poor, 24 fair, 44 good, and 18 excellent. Corn dented was 94 percent, equal to last year, and near 93 for the five-year average. Mature was 37 percent, behind 43 both last year and average. Harvested was 2 percent, equal to last year, but behind 7 average.

Soybean condition rated 4 percent very poor, 8 poor, 28 fair, 48 good, and 12 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 54 percent, ahead of 48 both last year and average. Harvested was 3 percent, near 2 both last year and average.

Winter wheat planted was 23 percent, behind 41 last year and 34 average.

Sorghum condition rated 3 percent very poor, 2 poor, 20 fair, 55 good, and 20 excellent. Sorghum coloring was 91 percent, behind 98 last year, but near 87 average. Mature was 30 percent, behind 39 last year, but ahead of 22 average. Harvested was 2 percent, near 0 both last year and average.

Alfalfa condition rated 4 percent very poor, 10 poor, 34 fair, 40 good, and 12 excellent. Alfalfa fourth cutting was 68 percent complete, ahead of 59 last year and 61 average.

Dry edible beans condition rated 9 percent very poor, 17 poor, 22 fair, 43 good, and 9 excellent. Dry edible beans dropping leaves was 76 percent, behind 89 last year and 85 average. Harvested was 35 percent, ahead of 27 last year and 30 average.

Proso millet harvested was 40 percent, ahead of 22 last year, but near 41 average.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 5 percent very poor, 20 poor, 45 fair, 27 good, and 3 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 2 percent very short, 10 short, 88 adequate, and 0 surplus.

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2017 Eastern South Dakota Water Conference to be held Nov. 8 https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/2017-eastern-south-dakota-water-conference-to-be-held-nov-8/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:46:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18986169 SDSU Extension

BROOKINGS — Registration is now open for the 2017 Eastern South Dakota Water Conference to be held Nov. 8 in the Student Union’s Volstorff Ballroom on the campus of South Dakota State University. This year’s conference focus is “South Dakota’s Water Resources: Where Are We Headed and How Will We Get There?”

“The framework will be unlike past meetings as the South Dakota Water Resources Institute at SDSU will host its first stakeholder working conference,” explained David Kringen, SDSU Extension water resources field specialist.

Conference details

The morning session will begin at 8:30 a.m. and consist of a comprehensive review of the current state of water quality in eastern South Dakota.

This session will include information on what is assessed and monitored, how the data is gathered, how it is reported and any long term trends that may be evident.

Both surface and groundwater resources will be discussed.

Attendees will learn about the South Dakota Integrated Report for Surface Water Quality Assessment, the National Rivers & Streams Assessment, the National Water Quality Initiative, the South Dakota Statewide Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network and more.

A poster presentation session will also be held during the morning break. Lunch is provided.

The afternoon session will consist of moderated roundtable discussions designed to engage attendees impacted by the information presented during the morning session.

Topics will include satisfaction with current monitoring strategies employed in South Dakota, future priorities and specific actions that may be taken as a result of the discussions.

It is the intent of the South Dakota Water Resources Institute at SDSU to compose a white paper summarizing the conference and the roundtable discussions.

Feedback from attendees will be used to help draft an action plan.

“This action plan will help guide the direction of future research opportunities as well as actions that can be taken as a group to sustain and improve our water resources in South Dakota,” Kringen said.

The South Dakota Water Resources Institute at SDSU encourages all stakeholders concerned with water quality in eastern South Dakota to attend the 2017 conference.

If you would like your voice to be heard concerning the future of South Dakota’s water resources, register at http://bit.ly/2xfG5mM.

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Ag Events Calendar https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/ag-events-calendar-42/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:46:02 +0000 http://ffimp-133387 Sept. 19, Watertown: 25th Senior Seminar, 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., at County Fair Banquet Hall, 605-886-8431.

Sept. 21-22, Rapid City: South Dakota Stockgrowers Association 126th Annual Convention and Tradeshow, at the Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center, 605-342-0429, southdakotastockgrowers.org

Sept. 21-23, Fargo, N.D.: North Dakota Stockmen’s Association to host 88th Annual Convention and Trade Show, at the Ramada Hotel & Conference Center, ndstockmen.org

Sept. 21-23, Gillette, Wyo.: Plains Area Corriente Show and Roping, at CAM-PLEX, http://bit.ly/2w98bQp, Tucker Ashley at 605-778-6885 (home) or 605-730-1073 (cell).

Sept. 23, Rapid City: Aging Gracefully Expo, 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., at Rushmore Plaza Civic, (605) 394-1722, leacey.brown@sdstate.edu

Sept. 23, Crooks: Crooks Plant Sale, at Crooks Community Hall, www.facebook.com/CrooksPlantSale/

Sept. 24, Stratford: BCOTTPA tractor pull, 12:30 p.m., season points pull off, Brown County sled, Ron Glugia 605-225-6621.

Sept. 26, Fargo, N.D.: NDSU Field Day, 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., at North Dakota State University campus, ndsu.edu/soilhealth/

Sept. 27, Huron: State Technicl Committee Meeting, 10 a.m., at Crossroads Hotel and Convention Center, www.sd.nrcs.usda.gov, (605) 352-1200

Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, Brookings: 80th Annual South Dakota Sheep Growers Association, at Days Inn & Convention Center, sdsheepgrowers.org

Sept. 30, Brookings: 2017 SD Make it With Wool state contest, at First Lutheran Church, 642-5123 or Snorteland@blackhills.com

Oct. 3, Pierre: Farming with Beneficial Insects for Pest Control: Conservation Biocontrol Short Course, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., at the SDSU Regional Extension Center, www.xerces.org/event/

Oct. 10, Pierre: Grassland Management Workshop, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., SDSU Regional Extension Center

Oct. 10, Center, N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 10 a.m. CST, at Betty Hagel Memorial Civic Center, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 10, Medora, N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 2 p.m. MST, at Chateau DeMores Interpretive Center, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 10, Bowman N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 7 p.m. MST, at 4-Seasons Building, Bowman County Fairgrounds, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 11, Mitchell: Grassland Management Workshop, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., SDSU Regional Extension Center

Oct. 11, Linton N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 10 a.m. CST, at Courthouse auditorium, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 11, Ashley N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 2 p.m. CST, at Courthouse, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 11, Napoleon N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 7 p.m. CST, at Napoleon Livestock Auction, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 12, Watertown: Grassland Management Workshop, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., SDSU Regional Extension Center

Oct. 12, Binford N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 9 a.m. CST, at Binford Fire Hall, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 12, Rugby N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 2 p.m. CST, at Dakota Farms, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 12, Minot N.D.: NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar, 7 p.m. CST, at North Central Research Extension Center, 701-857-7682, john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu

Oct. 18, Huron: PQA Plus and TQA Certification training, 1 p.m., at Beadle Co. Department of Health

Oct. 19-20, Deadwood: South Dakota Women in Ag annual conference, at The Lodge, www.southdakotawomeninag.com or facebook.com/SouthDakotaWomeninAg

Oct. 25-28, Indianapolis: 2017 National FFA Convention & Expo

Nov. 1-2, Dickinson, N.D.: Western Dakota Energy Association annual meeting, at the Ramada Grand Dakota Lodge

Nov. 2, Rock Rapids, IA: Siouxland Dairy Lender’s Seminar, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., at the Forester Community Center, 712-737-4230, fredhall@iastate.edu

Nov 2-4, Spearfish: South Dakota Local Foods Conference, at Spearfish Holiday Inn, sdspamembers@gmail.com

Nov. 4-6, Fort Worth, TX: 2017 Angus Convention, at Fort Worth Convention Center, angusconvention.com

Nov. 6-9, San Diego, CA: AgGateway 2017 Annual Conference, at Hilton San Diego Resort and Spa, www.AgGateway.org

Nov. 7-9, Des Moines, IA: National Pork Board Pig Welfare Symposium

Nov. 8, Brookings: 2017 Eastern South Dakota Water Conference, 8:30 a.m., at SDSU Student Union’s Volstorff Ballroom, http://bit.ly/2xfG5mM.

Nov. 16-18, Bloomington, MN: 2017 American Agri-Women convention

Nov. 28-30, Cheyenne, WY: 2017 Range Beef Cow Symposium, at Little America Resort and Convention Center, Rangebeefcow.com

Nov. 28-30, Phoenix, AZ: 2017 Agricultural Retailers Association (ARA) Conference & Expo, at Arizona Biltmore Hotel

Dec. 7-9, Wichita, KS: 47th Annual American Gelbvieh Association National Convention, at the Hyatt Regency Wichita, gelbvieh.org

Jan. 27-30, San Diego, CA: ASTA’s 57th Vegetable and Flower Seed Conference, at Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina

May 20-23, Lexington, KY: ONE: The Alltech Ideas Conference

AGRICALENDAR is a Farm Forum feature. Items for this calendar should be submitted in writing at least a week before the desired publication date. Send to Farm Forum AGRICALENDAR, American News., P.O. Box 4430, Aberdeen, S.D. 57402-4430.

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Ag Business Briefs https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/ag-business-briefs-136/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:26:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18916994 Report: South Dakota corn, soybean crop to decline this year

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota’s corn and soybeans crops this year are expected to fall short of last year’s harvests.

Based on Sept. 1 conditions, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says South Dakota’s 2017 corn crop is forecast at 696 million bushels. That’s down 16 percent from last year’s production.

The average yield for corn is forecast at 145 bushels per acre, down 16 bushels from last year.

Soybean production is forecast at 241 million bushels, down 6 percent from last year. Soybean yield is forecast at 45 bushels per acre, down 4.5 bushels from last year.

Sorghum for grain production in South Dakota also is forecast to decline from last year’s harvest. But dry edible pea production is expected to be up 11 percent from last year, although yield will be down.

Minnesota seeing growing number of sick maple trees

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Many maple trees across the Minneapolis area are sick and have been turning color and dropping leaves before the official start of autumn.

Alan Branhagen is the director of operations at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. He told the Star Tribune that the arboretum has been flooded with questions about the early leaf drop.

“It’s becoming epidemic,” he said of the distressed, yellow-leafed maples, some already with bare branches that have raised curiosity and concern this growing season.

Branhagen said rot may be causing the maples to decline. Irrigation systems and thick mulch can result in conditions that are too soggy for the trees.

“Sugar maples like it moist but not wet,” Branhagen said.

Certified arborist Travis McDonald said many of the trees are suffering from root girdling, which is when roots grow around each other and prevent nutrients from going to the tree.

Maples are particularly susceptible to girdling because they have a fast-growing and shallow root system.

Many trees that are sold at nurseries and garden centers are grown in containers instead of fields, which causes roots to become tangled before the tree is purchased and planted.

The increase in distressed maples may be because many of the early container maples planted in the area are now mature, Branhagen said.

Many distressed maples lack stability and therefore should be removed because they’re more prone to windfall, Branhagen said.

Residents with distressed trees should consult a tree expert to diagnose the problem and see if the tree can be saved, McDonald said.

Farm incident ruled accidental

A farm accident where a woman was apparently run over by an empty grain-hauling trailer was been ruled accidental, according to Codington County Sheriff Brad Howell.

Codington County deputies drove to 17075 446th Ave. after receiving a call that someone had been run over by a vehicle.

Deputies spoke to Annette Schultz, age 55, who said that an empty grain trailer driven by Lawrence Schultz, 66, had back over her and she was dragged for a short distance.

Schultz was taken by Watertown Fire Rescue ambulance to Prairie Lakes Healthcare System. Deputies reported that she did not appear to have any life-threatening injuries.

— Dakota Media Group

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2017 South Dakota State Fair Livestock Champions https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/2017-south-dakota-state-fair-livestock-champions/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 20:26:01 +0000 http://ffimp-18944882 #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item1 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-25-18944671-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item2 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-95-18944678-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item3 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-52-18944675-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item4 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-36-18944676-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item5 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-71-18944672-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item6 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-56-18944674-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item7 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-89-18945024-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_1_59c24705d26a7 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item8 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/19-85-18944673-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; }

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Crop Progress and Pasture Conditions https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/crop-progress-and-pasture-conditions-124/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 19:16:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18984673 U.S. Department of Agriculture

South Dakota

SIOUX FALLS – For the week ending September 17, 2017, producers continued cutting silage and seeding winter wheat under warm, dry weather, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Temperatures were well above average for mid-September as afternoon highs warmed to the 80s and 90s in many locations early in the week. Cooler temperatures returned by week’s end along with showers and thunderstorms across western and east central South Dakota. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 22 percent very short, 26 short, 51 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 29 percent very short, 34 short, 37 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 12 percent very poor, 16 poor, 32 fair, 36 good, and 4 excellent. Corn dented was 77 percent, behind 88 last year and 89 for the five-year average. Corn mature was 14 percent, well behind 38 both last year and average.

Soybean condition rated 6 percent very poor, 13 poor, 35 fair, 40 good, and 6 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 49 percent, behind 64 last year and 63 average.

Sorghum condition rated 9 percent very poor, 20 poor, 54 fair, 17 good, and 0 excellent. Sorghum coloring was 73 percent, behind 91 last year and 90 average. Mature was 17 percent, well behind 44 last year, and behind 31 average.

Sunflower condition rated 8 percent very poor, 21 poor, 45 fair, 24 good, and 2 excellent. Sunflowers ray flowers dried was 71 percent, ahead of 60 last year, but behind 77 average. Bracts turning yellow was 35 percent, ahead of 27 last year, but behind 47 average. Bracts turning brown was 10 percent.

Alfalfa condition rated 31 percent very poor, 32 poor, 20 fair, 16 good, and 1 excellent. Alfalfa second cutting was 88 percent complete, behind 94 last year. Third cutting was 61 percent, behind 68 last year and 76 average.

Barley harvested was 96 percent.

Winter wheat planted was 30 percent, ahead of 18 last year and 24 average. Emerged was 1 percent, equal to both last year and average.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range condition rated 31 percent very poor, 27 poor, 27 fair, 15 good, and 0 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 23 percent very short, 33 short, 43 adequate, and 1 surplus.

North Dakota

FARGO, N.D. – For the week ending September 17, 2017, much needed precipitation was received over much of the State, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Moisture amounts ranged from over an inch in the western part of the State to a quarter of an inch in the east. The moisture halted or delayed most harvest activities, but was welcomed by producers. Temperatures averaged two degrees below normal in the western part of the State, but two to six degrees above normal in the east. There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 13 percent very short, 31 short, 55 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 18 percent very short, 36 short, 45 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 5 percent very poor, 11 poor, 33 fair, 45 good, and 6 excellent. Corn dough was 98 percent, near 100 last year, and equal to the five-year average. Dented was 77 percent, behind 86 last year and 83 average. Mature was 17 percent, well behind 38 last year, and behind 32 average.

Soybean condition rated 5 percent very poor, 12 poor, 35 fair, 44 good, and 4 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 73 percent, near 71 last year and 72 average. Harvested was 2 percent, equal to last year, but behind 8 average.

Winter wheat planted was 33 percent, near 32 last year. Emerged was 2 percent.

Spring wheat harvested was 97 percent, near 98 last year, but ahead of 91 average.

Oats harvested was 96 percent, near 100 last year and 95 average.

Sunflowers condition rated 8 percent very poor, 13 poor, 44 fair, 34 good, and 1 excellent. Sunflower ray flowers dried was 93 percent, near 89 last year, and ahead of 88 average. Bracts turning yellow was 77 percent, near 73 last year, and ahead of 59 average. Bracts turning brown was 32 percent, near 31 last year.

Dry edible beans condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 28 fair, 49 good, and 7 excellent. Dry edible beans dropping leaves was 96 percent, near 92 last year and 93 average. Harvested was 44 percent near 41 last year and 46 average.

Durum wheat harvested was 95 percent, ahead of 84 last year and 77 average.

Canola harvested was 91 percent, near 88 last year, and ahead of 85 average.

Flaxseed harvested was 87 percent, near 84 last year, and ahead of 68 average.

Potato condition rated 4 percent very poor, 13 poor, 27 fair, 51 good, and 5 excellent. Potatoes vines dry was 81 percent, near 82 last year, but ahead of 72 average. Harvested was 28 percent, ahead of 14 last year and 18 average.

Alfalfa second cutting was 97 percent complete, near 94 last year.

Sugarbeet condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 5 fair, 27 good, and 67 excellent. Sugarbeets harvested was 9 percent, equal to last year, and near 10 average.

Lentils harvested was 94 percent, near 91 last year.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 28 percent very poor, 30 poor, 32 fair, 10 good, and 0 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 19 percent very short, 34 short, 46 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Minnesota

Warm conditions aided maturity of corn and soybeans and contributed to a rapid harvest pace of dry edible beans during the week ending September 17, 2017, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Some areas reported fall tillage delays due to dry conditions. Harvest continued for corn silage, sugarbeets, potatoes, and alfalfa hay.

Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short, 16 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 4 percent very short, 15 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus.

Eighty-six percent of the corn for grain crop reached the dent stage, remaining 5 days behind the 5-year average. Thirteen percent had reached maturity, 10 days behind both last year and average. Corn for silage was 30 percent complete, 11 days behind average. Corn condition was 81 percent good to excellent. Eighty-one percent of the soybean crop was turning color with 36 percent dropping leaves. Scattered reports of soybean harvesting were noted in northern Minnesota. Soybean condition remained at 72 percent good to excellent.

Nearly all of the dry edible bean crop was dropping leaves. One-quarter of the dry edible crop was harvested during the week, making the total harvest progress 44 percent complete. Dry edible bean condition rating was 66 percent good to excellent. Sunflower condition remained at 86 percent good to excellent. Potato harvest was 48 percent complete. Potato crop condition remained at 92 percent good to excellent. Sugarbeets were 8 percent lifted. Sugarbeet condition was unchanged at 89 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 87 percent complete. Pasture condition declined to 54 percent good to excellent.

Iowa

It was mostly dry in Iowa with above normal temperatures for the week ending September 17, 2017, according to USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork. With increased heat and little moisture, crops matured rapidly in the past week. Activities for the week included seeding cover crops, spreading manure, harvesting seed corn, chopping corn silage, and hauling grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 21 percent very short, 30 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 0 percent surplus. According to the September 12, 2017 U.S. Drought Monitor, parts of south central and southeast Iowa remain in extreme drought status. Subsoil moisture levels rated 20 percent very short, 34 percent short, 46 percent adequate and 0 percent surplus.

Eighty-eight percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage or beyond, eight days behind last year and three days behind the 5-year average. Thirty percent of corn had reached maturity, six days behind last year and average. Reports were received from throughout the state that corn harvest for grain has begun. Corn condition declined slightly to 59 percent good to excellent. Seventy-four percent soybeans were turning color or beyond, two days behind last year but one day ahead of average. Thirty-one percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, one day behind average. Scattered soybean fields across most of the state have been harvested. Soybean condition dropped to 58 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay is nearly complete at 96 percent. Pasture conditions worsened over the past week with 47 percent poor to very poor. Livestock conditions remain good, although there were scattered reports of flies and pink eye being an issue.

Nebraska

LINCOLN, Neb. – For the week ending September 17, 2017, temperatures averaged four to eight degrees above normal, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Precipitation ranged from half an inch to an inch across a majority of the State. Dry edible bean harvest was underway in western counties. There were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 10 percent very short, 33 short, 56 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 11 percent very short, 36 short, 52 adequate, and 1 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 5 percent very poor, 9 poor, 24 fair, 44 good, and 18 excellent. Corn dented was 94 percent, equal to last year, and near 93 for the five-year average. Mature was 37 percent, behind 43 both last year and average. Harvested was 2 percent, equal to last year, but behind 7 average.

Soybean condition rated 4 percent very poor, 8 poor, 28 fair, 48 good, and 12 excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was 54 percent, ahead of 48 both last year and average. Harvested was 3 percent, near 2 both last year and average.

Winter wheat planted was 23 percent, behind 41 last year and 34 average.

Sorghum condition rated 3 percent very poor, 2 poor, 20 fair, 55 good, and 20 excellent. Sorghum coloring was 91 percent, behind 98 last year, but near 87 average. Mature was 30 percent, behind 39 last year, but ahead of 22 average. Harvested was 2 percent, near 0 both last year and average.

Alfalfa condition rated 4 percent very poor, 10 poor, 34 fair, 40 good, and 12 excellent. Alfalfa fourth cutting was 68 percent complete, ahead of 59 last year and 61 average.

Dry edible beans condition rated 9 percent very poor, 17 poor, 22 fair, 43 good, and 9 excellent. Dry edible beans dropping leaves was 76 percent, behind 89 last year and 85 average. Harvested was 35 percent, ahead of 27 last year and 30 average.

Proso millet harvested was 40 percent, ahead of 22 last year, but near 41 average.

Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 5 percent very poor, 20 poor, 45 fair, 27 good, and 3 excellent.

Stock water supplies rated 2 percent very short, 10 short, 88 adequate, and 0 surplus.

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NDSU Calf Backgrounding and Feeding Seminar Series set https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/ndsu-calf-backgrounding-and-feeding-seminar-series-set/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:46:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18983947 NDSU Extension

With drought, lack of hay and volatile market prices, North Dakota cattle producers are faced with difficult choices.

One option is to add value to the calves by feeding them in North Dakota instead of selling them. To address this issue, the North Dakota State University Extension Service is holding a series of local seminars on feeding and backgrounding calves and cow feed management.

“Backgrounding calves is a margin business,” says Karl Hoppe, area Extension livestock systems specialist at the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center. “When the cost of gain is lower than the value of the gain, feeding calves works. However, feed costs are so variable in North Dakota. Freight cost becomes a huge issue, and the cost of shipping feed is figured into the cost of gain.

“With the drought, the cost of forage is quite high,” he adds. “That’s contrary to the grain prices, which are fairly low.”

John Dhuyvetter, area Extension livestock systems specialist at the NDSU North Central Research Extension Center near Minot, notes, “Rations with higher inclusions of grain or coproducts result in higher average daily gain and improved feed conversion. This might make cattle-feeding budgets profitable. It’s time to figure your costs.”

The dates, times and locations for the series of meetings are:

• Oct. 10 – 10 a.m. CST, Center, Betty Hagel Memorial Civic Center.

• Oct. 10 – 2 p.m. MST, Medora, Chateau DeMores Interpretive Center.

• Oct. 10 – 7 p.m. MST, Bowman, 4-Seasons Building, Bowman County Fairgrounds.

• Oct. 11 – 10 a.m. CST, Linton, Courthouse auditorium.

• Oct. 11 – 2 p.m. CST, Ashley, Courthouse.

• Oct. 11 – 7 p.m. CST, Napoleon, Napoleon Livestock Auction.

• Oct. 12 – 9 a.m. CST, Binford, Binford Fire Hall.

• Oct. 12 – 2 p.m. CST, Rugby, Dakota Farms, 308 Hwy 2 S.E.

• Oct. 12 – 7 p.m. CST, Minot, North Central Research Extension Center.

Topics for the meetings are:

• Local issues for cattle feed – local NDSU Extension agriculture and natural resources agent.

• Feeding calf-growing rations – Hoppe.

• Backgrounding calf budgets – Dhuyvetter.

• Cow herd feed management – Janna Kincheloe, area Extension livestock specialist, NDSU Hettinger Research Extension Center.

For more information, contact Dhuyvetter at 701-857-7682 or john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu, Kincheloe at 701-567-4323 or janna.kincheloe@ndsu.edu, Hoppe at 701-652-2951 or karl.hoppe@ndsu.edu, or your local Extension agent.

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South Dakota Farm Bureau donates life saving equipment to fire department https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/south-dakota-farm-bureau-donates-life-saving-equipment-to-fire-department/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:46:01 +0000 http://ffimp-18983851 South Dakota Farm Bureau

It seems simple. A single tube. But it’s something that could mean the difference between life and death in a grain bin. Thanks to a donation by the South Dakota Farm Bureau Centennial Community Initiative, producers in Brookings and Kingsbury counties will have this resource available to them.

“There are a lot of grain bins being added to farms in our area,” said Craig Weber, Brookings – Kingsbury County Farm Bureau president. “With the donation of rescue tubes and supporting equipment, members of the Arlington, Bruce and Sinai Fire Departments will have the tools and training they need to provide a higher level of service to our community.”

The donation will be recognized on Sept. 22 at 10 a.m. at the Arlington Volunteer Fire Department in Arlington, S.D. Following the recognition, the new equipment will be on display.

Funding was made possible by a $5,000 donation from the South Dakota Farm Bureau combined with a $2,200 donation from the Brookings – Kingsbury County Farm Bureau. This is one of many SDFB Centennial Community Initiative projects that have been announced this summer. The SDFB Centennial Community Initiative is a grant program for community projects that serve a need in a community, make a difference, have high visibility and reflect Farm Bureau’s mission and vision. SDFB is investing $100,000 in local communities for community improvement projects during its centennial year in 2017.

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Six counties remain in state’s drive to bring ag-land assessments up https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/six-counties-remain-in-states-drive-to-bring-ag-land-assessments-up/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:26:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18984116 By Bob Mercer
Farm Forum Correspondent

PIERRE – Property values set this year by equalization directors for farms and ranches were close to the mark in most South Dakota counties, a state official said on Sept. 18.

The laggards for cropland were:

• Butte 16 percent.

• Campbell 18 percent.

• Corson 55 percent.

• Harding 22 percent.

• Perkins 15 percent.

Lake was 33 percent behind for non-cropland.

South Dakota has 66 counties.

Mike Houdyshell presented those results to the Legislature’s task force overseeing agricultural land assessments.

He is director of property and special taxes for state government’s Department of Revenue.

Four of the five counties behind on cropland values are west of the Missouri River.

Houdyshell said they probably were low at the start. “They’re still getting through this hangover period,” he said.

Legislators established the task force in 2008. The members advise the department regarding rules on assessment and taxation of agricultural lands.

The 2008 law directed the task force contract with South Dakota State University for recommendations.

Cropland data include soil type, acres planted, acres harvested, yield per acre, and statewide crop prices.

Noncropland data include cash rents, rangeland acres, pastureland acres, rangeland and pastureland animal-units per acre, grazing season and statewide cow and calf prices

For crops, an Olympic-style average in each county is built from eight consecutive years, with the high year and the low year discarded.

Depending how far they are behind, counties are limited by state law to annual increases of 15 to 25 percent. Those caps come off for taxes payable in 2020.

Houdyshell said sales of farm and ranch ground in 65 counties averaged 44.4 percent of assessed values in 2016.

“It demonstrates that we were on the right track, that the actual sales had little to do with productivity,” Rep. Larry Rhoden, R-Union Center, said. He is the task force’s chairman.

Switching from market value to a productivity system represents “some semblance of fairness,” Rhoden said.

Former Sen. Jim Peterson, D-Revillo, suggested task force members consider a 3 percent limit because of the drought, except for counties more than 10 percent behind.

The next meeting is Oct. 30.

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Alfalfa fall cutting considerations https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/alfalfa-fall-cutting-considerations/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:26:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18983817 By Karla A. Hernandez
SDSU Extension Forages Field Specialist

As we move into fall, many producers are considering one final cutting. If the stand is going to be kept in production for the next year it is important to remember that the last cutting should be done 4 to 6 weeks prior to the first expected killing frost. It is usually safe to cut around mid-September however, later than that might not be the best option as the stand might be at risk if it does not have enough regrowth.

It is import to consider that during late summer and early fall, alfalfa plants are preparing for winter by developing two major properties: (1) cold resistance, and (2) storage of energy reserves in their root system. Harvesting alfalfa during this time will probably allow a few weeks of regrowth before the first expected killing frost.

How to minimize stand losses for next year?

• Taking at least one harvest during the summer at 1/10 bloom.

• Fall harvesting young stands.

• Maintaining high soil fertility levels.

• Planting alfalfa varieties with good disease resistance and winter hardiness.

Harvesting alfalfa at a time that only allows a few weeks for regrowth before the herbage is killed by frost will greatly reduce the energy reserves in the roots which increase the risk of stand loss. Forage producers must consider if the need for forage in the fall does not increase the potential risk for stand losses during the winter. Historically, harvesting through the middle of September is adequate; however, one needs to be cautious with any cuttings later than that, if the intention is to keep the stand in production.

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USDA makes disaster resources available to Rural Development borrowers https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/usda-makes-disaster-resources-available-to-rural-development-borrowers/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:26:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18983446 U.S. Department of Agriculture

WASHINGTON – The United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development is providing tools and resources to help rural communities recover from the devastation brought by hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue highlighted recently. The emergency procedures will provide additional flexibility for Rural Development borrowers and community partners to help them recover as quickly as possible and ensure they have what they need to rebuild their homes, businesses and communities.

“Our team at Rural Development is devoted to supporting rural communities ravaged by the recent hurricanes,” said Secretary Perdue. “We are committed each day to the recovery effort, collaborating with federal, state and local partners to begin to rebuild.”

USDA Rural Development has provided disaster recovery assistance by coordinating with private partners to restore utilities to rural communities in hurricane-affected regions.

Rural Development is helping businesses and utilities that are current USDA borrowers by considering requests to defer principal and/or interest payments, and to provide additional temporary loans. Current USDA single-family home loan customers may also qualify for assistance. Borrowers can contact their local Rural Development office to obtain information on potential assistance. Additional information may be found at http://bit.ly/2myzXmy.

USDA Rural Development is partnering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which is taking the lead to provide emergency housing for people who need it in these affected areas.

To find the nearest USDA Rural Development office, visit www.rd.usda.gov/contact-us.

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; homeownership; community services such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

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SD commissioner wants to trade for State Fair land https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/19/sd-commissioner-wants-to-trade-for-state-fair-land/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:56:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18983911 By Bob Mercer
Farm Forum Correspondent

PIERRE — Ryan Brunner, state government’s commissioner of school and public lands, wants to trade 58.5 acres of public lands that South Dakota owns in rural Hand and Spink counties for 7.5 acres of private property listed for sale in Huron next to the State Fair.

The state Department of Agriculture currently pays $2,500 per year to lease the Huron property. Livestock trailers and carnival trailers park there during events at the fairgrounds.

The Huron parcel at the fair’s southeast corner is valued at $104,900. The state lands are appraised at $117,366.03.

The trade would generate $12,446.03 of cash for state government.

Brunner said it would be invested in the state trust fund for K-12 public schools. His office also would receive $2,500 annually by taking over the Huron lease. The state parcels involved in the trade currently lease for $612.50.

He said an additional potential benefit is the state Department of Agriculture wouldn’t need to look to lease another area near the fair site.

His office has an option on the Huron land owned by Azkota Investments Inc. The secretary of state issued a certificate of administrative dissolution April 20, 2015, against the Huron-based company for failing to file its annual report when due.

The South Dakota Board of Appraisal considered the proposed transactions at its Sept. 12 meeting. Brunner and Steve Barnett, state government’s auditor, comprise the board.

Brunner said the exchange could be performed after a public hearing and needs the governor’s approval. He said the public hearings are Oct. 11.

The hearings are one hour each, starting at 9 a.m. CDT at the Hand County Courthouse in Miller; 11:30 a.m. CDT at the Spink County Courthouse in Redfield; and 2 p.m. CDT at the Beadle County Courthouse in Huron.

“The advantage is that with the land being for sale, they might have lost this use,” Brunner said. “We can give them a long-term lease and the certainty that they will have that land for parking every year.”

State contractor Northern Plains Appraisal placed a value of $2,000 per acre on the Hand County parcel that covers 160 acres about two miles north of Miller. The state board accepted that figure.

Brunner’s plan involves trading 50 acres from the Hand County parcel and 8.5 acres of abandoned railroad right of way in Spink County for the Huron land.

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Auction marks passing of an era https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/auction-marks-passing-of-an-era/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 20:56:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18975047 #td_uid_2_59c24705e090d .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item1 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/18-36-18975229-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_2_59c24705e090d .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item2 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/18-59-18975225-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; }

By Victoria Lusk
vlusk@aberdeennews.com

Just outside of Eden sits China Town, a building that’s story is woven with tales of hard work, love, triumph and community.

China Town opened in 1959 when the late John “Hunce” Thuringer and his wife, Margaret, purchased land with the intent of starting their own business. She was working as a schoolteacher, as she had since her days at a one-room schoolhouse in Marshall County. He was farming and operating a small mechanic shop.

Soon, their business became a gathering place. A bar and bar back were moved from the Hillhead bar, gas was flowing from pumps and John Thuringer continued perfecting his skills as a mechanic.

For a short time, a café was added.

“I’m not sure why they decided (opening China Town) was a good idea,” said Heather Aldentaler, the granddaughter of John and Margaret Thuringer. “Grandma is a force to be reckoned with. If she decides she’s going to do something, she’s going to do it and she’s going to do it well. Grandpa probably just said OK.”

John Thuringer died 20 years ago, Aldentaler said.

His wife hasn’t let go of any of their shared story.

Until now.

China Town closed in August 2016 when Margaret Thuringer, now 90, was diagnosed with cancer for the second time. Today, she’s cancer-free, which surprised the family, but not Thuringer, Aldentaler said.

“She’s very proud of beating cancer twice. We didn’t expect this outcome. But she said it would be fine. She went into it as a woman of faith and there she was,” Aldentaler said.

Still, the diagnosis prompted changes. Thuringer now lives in an assisted living center in Sisseton. And she decided she can let go of some pieces of the past.

Last weekend, many of those memories were up for auction at China Town. The family, neighbors and others spent the summer and longer going through items collected by the Thuringers through the decades. Among them were the books Thuringer used when she first began to teach, railroad and farming tools, neon lights advertising different beer brands and unopened decanters.

“She kept everything. Everything. … A friend of mine said, ‘Heather, what you have here is a time capsule,’” Aldentaler said.

If these walls could talk

The question isn’t an uncommon one, Aldentaler said. Why China Town in northeast South Dakota?

It certainly wasn’t named to negate the Thuringers’ strong German roots, rather because the area was known as China Town “back in the day,” Aldentaler said.

As her grandma tells it, several Chinese workers built the railroad through Eden. They stayed in an encampment called China Town. Her grandma hadn’t thought of a name for the business until somebody asked how to make out a check.

“I’ll just call it China Town,” Thuringer said, according to Aldentaler.

Although the auction was bittersweet, Aldentaler said she enjoyed hearing all the stories — from her grandmother and others who have memories.

Jim and Janice Brakefield of Webster had their wedding reception at China Town in March 1972. Despite blizzard conditions, the place was still packed, Jim Brakefield said. That’s how it goes in a small town.

It wasn’t the only time China Town was full, of course.

James Sattler of Eden remembers the business opening and how both Thuringers would stand outside in frigid weather to pump gas. Sattler also recalls that Hunce Thuringer was a pretty great mechanic.

“Farmers came to town, stopped for gas and a few beers. Sometimes too many,” Sattler said. “Hunce and Margaret liked to visit. They didn’t care whether you bought anything or not.”

On Sundays, China Town used to get some pretty big crowds, Sattler said.

“Eden always closed up, but it was out of town,” he explained.

People gathered even on the hottest summer days, when fans blew and sweat dripped, but the beer was still cold, Sattler said. The chatter was constant.

“Some knew everything, and some knew nothing,” he said.

“Everyone stopped there when they went to town. On a rainy day, the whole bar would be lined up with farmers talking,” Sattler said.

While the wooden bar, bar back and things within the walls were set to be auctioned off, the building, land and liquor license will remain owned by Aldentaler’s mother, DeLaine Aldentaler.

Vold Auctioneers & Realty of Britton handled the sale.

The sale marks the passing of an era, agent Karen Muth said.

She has her own memories of China Town.

“It was the place to go for years and years and years for a three-county area when I grew up, especially in the summer time,” she said. “Anyone that grew up in the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, it was part of their life.”

The auction was an opportunity for people to take a bit of that history — perhaps part of their own past — with them, Muth said.

Heather Aldentaler knows China Town is the life story of her grandparents. While it’s unknown what will come of the building, the goal is to show that story justice and honor it, she said.

She’s plucked one keepsake for herself, a bar sign that reads, “You’re a stranger but once.”

“That’s how they treated people,” Aldentaler said. “I was very proud of that.”

Follow @vlusk_AAN on Twitter.

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Strong safety net needed in next farm bill, ag groups agree https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/strong-safety-net-needed-in-next-farm-bill-ag-groups-agree/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 20:26:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18975011 By Victoria Lusk
vlusk@aberdeennews.com

While a better farm bill might be the aim for some farmers and ranchers, others say maintaining status quo would do.

To put it another way, they don’t want to see cuts to any agriculture programs when they’re already struggling financially.

Farmers don’t plant their crops to be able to gather program payments or collect crop insurance, said Aberdeen farmer Kirk Schaunaman.

“But there are two things we can’t control: the weather — Mother Nature — and the prices we receive,” he said. “Those two things work against you and it can be detrimental.”

That’s why local producers rely on safety net programs in the farm bill. Those include crop insurance, disaster assistance and programs that support lower commodity prices.

Those benefits are so important to family farms that Schaunaman traveled to Washington, D.C., last week with other representatives from South Dakota Farmers Union.

But Farmers Union is not the only group pushing for those programs.

“A strong safety net is very important for American agriculture,” said Scott VanderWal of Volga, president of the South Dakota Farm Bureau.

At times, Farmers Union and Farm Bureau are at political odds, with Farmers Union being left-leaning and Farm Bureau on the right. On this issue, though, they are united.

A big part of the “safety net” both groups talk about is crop insurance, VanderWal said, which goes along with the farm commodity programs offered in the 2014 farm bill. A new farm bill is set to be crafted this year, though Congress doesn’t always stay on schedule.

Two of the benefits in the last farm bill include the Price Loss Coverage program and the Agriculture Risk Coverage program — more commonly referred to as PLC or ARC by farmers, who have to choose one or the other.

The two programs are complicated. Here’s how they work, in simplest terms:

• With PLC, farmers receive payments if a covered commodity’s national average marketing year price is lower than the price listed in the farm bill.

• With ARC, crop revenue is estimated using average county yields and farmers receive payments if the actual crop revenue is less than the county revenue guarantee.

Most producers have been using ARC the last few years, VanderWal said. But because it uses an Olympic average structure — eight years, eliminating the high and low years —and agriculture is in a period of declining prices, the benefits of that program are eroding, he said. That has most farmers thinking they’ll swap to PLC unless Congress changes things, he said.

Recently, there has been talk of minor tweaks to the programs, Schaunaman said. Some minor changes could be made, VanderWal said — like using crop insurance data instead of relying on surveys sent to farmers to assess their planting and production conditions. Historically, those surveys do not get returned, he said.

The idea of more significant changes has some producers in a defensive mood because budget cuts would be very harmful, Schaunaman said.

“We don’t want to rob one portion to pay for another portion,” he said. “Producers are struggling out here, especially in the current environment.”

People have to realize that the last farm bill was written during favorable times, Schaunaman said. In fact, VanderWal said, when the 2014 farm bill was authored, most people thought the programs wouldn’t be needed. And they weren’t the first few years, he said.

But things have changed. Nationwide, land and cattle have been lost to wildfires, soil and crops have been sucked nearly dry by drought, and, most recently, hurricanes have devastated the South.

In South Dakota, most farmers are predicting lower-than-normal yields this year and commodity prices are low. According to the National Farmers Union, the median 2017 farm income is projected to be negative.

Net farm income has dropped by 50 percent in the last four years, according to Farmers Union information.

South Dakota Farmers Union members tried to make that clear when they visited Washington as part of their annual “fly-in” last week. The group offered some suggestions to Congress:

• Improve current farm programs.

• Protect crop insurance.

• Provide increased access to credit.

• Support agriculture mediation programs, which provide support to farmers struggling to meet current financial obligations.

Schaunaman farms west of Aberdeen with his brother Craig Schaunaman, the former state executive director of Farm Service Agency.

While the men know their way around the farm bill as well as anyone, their operation has suffered just like everybody else’s, Kirk Schaunaman said. He’s waiting for the crops to turn before firing up the combine. But considering current commodity prices, he thinks the farm will be “a ways off from breaking even.”

Schaunaman has been participating in the fly-in on and off for 20 years, including the last three years.

“You wouldn’t continue to come back if you didn’t think you were making progress. The ones that show up are the ones they’re going to listen to,” he said.

The National Farmers Union follows up after the fly-in, said Doug Sombke of Conde, South Dakota Farmers Union president.

“These are important times,” he said. “We can’t back up. We have to continue to work.”

The 26 South Dakota Farmers Union members who went to Washington met with all three members of the state’s congressional delegation. They also split into groups of three to five people to meet with members of Congress from other states.

Getting that face time is extremely important considering how few members of the U.S. House and U.S. Senate have agriculture ties, Sombke said.

“That’s why it’s so important for family farmers to get out here and share their story. We can all share it in a coffee shop, but until you get out here and tell it … then, they get it,” he said. “And hopefully they use our stories when they work on the farm bill.”

Follow @vlusk_AAN on Twitter.

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Matt Hesse named CEO of FieldReveal joint venture https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/matt-hesse-named-ceo-of-fieldreveal-joint-venture/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:06:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973609 Wheat Growers

Watertown — Matt Hesse has been selected as the chief executive officer of FieldReveal, a newly launched joint venture formed to deliver the next generation of precision agriculture tools and capabilities to agronomists, producers and ag retailers.

Hesse is a successful agribusiness leader with 20 years of experience in ag retail and precision agriculture. He most recently served Winfield United as senior manager of the retail technology field team with responsibilities for strategic planning and sales management.

“Matt has had a successful career in sales agronomy,” said Chris Pearson, interim board president for FieldReveal and CEO of Wheat Growers. “Matt has been involved in precision agriculture platforms and solutions for the majority of his career and has been a key leader in both sales performance and technology adoption for the organizations he has served. We’re pleased to introduce Matt as the first CEO of the newly launched FieldReveal organization.”

Prior to Winfield United, Hesse spent 10 years with Trimble in the Trimble Agriculture division. Hesse began at Trimble as a regional sales manager, moved to a business sales segment manager role for Trimble Worldwide, and then to director of sales for the North and South America segments of Trimble Agriculture.

Before joining Trimble, Hesse served four years in Global Technologies by AGCO, managing precision ag software programs. He started his career as an agronomy productions specialist with Agriliance in Sibley, Iowa, where he managed fertilizer, seed and chemical recommendations and implemented precision agriculture programs.

Hesse is a graduate of the Land O’Lakes Executive Agribusiness Program (LEAP) and has an ag-business associate’s degree from Ridgewater College in Willmar.

About FieldReveal

FieldReveal is a joint venture formed by four agribusinesses — Wheat Growers, Landus Cooperative, Central Valley Ag and WinField United. FieldReveal is a direct outgrowth of the MZB Precision Farming System from Wheat Growers.

Headquartered in Watertown, S.D., FieldReveal is designed to enhance the partnership between ag retailers, agronomists and their producer customers. Built by agronomists for agronomists, FieldReveal now offers its precision ag technology to ag retailers and agronomists nationwide.

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Farm Management Minute: Resiliency of the prairie https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/farm-management-minute-resiliency-of-the-prairie/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:46:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973576 By Lori Tonak
SDCFRM Instructor

As I have traveled through my territory this summer, the radio was a constant reminder of all that was going on in our great country-drought in South Dakota, North Dakota, and Montana; fires in California, Oregon, Washington and Montana; hurricanes in Texas, Louisiana, Florida and Puerto Rico. The staggering impact to agriculture in these states and territories was a constant thought in my daily travels.

As the summer wore on and rain started falling in late July in the central part of the state, an amazing thing started happening. A quarter inch of rain caused grass, corn and soybeans to green up in a matter of hours. As the rains continued, dormant plants that had shut down processes to save themselves came back to life and started growing again. Cattle started spreading out in the pastures to graze again, instead of standing in the corner stomping and fighting flies. Now, this moisture has not saved the day by any stretch, but it has helped turn some things around. There may now be a soybean crop, corn may grow a little more and possibly not be in jeopardy of high nitrates, and some farms and ranches actually got a cutting of hay.

This resiliency of the plant life is much like the people that choose to make their home on the prairie. Farmers and ranchers are some of the most resilient, optimistic people I know. Even as the heat was bearing down at the height of summer, with no rain in sight, most of the people I work with stayed optimistic, showing an attitude of this too shall pass. I am sure the same can be said for all the agriculture producers in all the states affected by the weather and fires. To survive in this farm/ranch life, resiliency and optimism are important characteristics helping people survive on the Great Plains for generations.

Now, if you did not have that optimism throughout the summer that is okay. However, if you feel that everything you touched or tried has turned sour, you cannot get out of bed in the morning, you cannot sleep at night for all the worry going through your head, and your moods are on an up and down roller coaster, you may want to seek professional help. All of those things are signs of depression and have a negative impact on your life. There is a stigma around seeking professional help as people feel it shows weakness but, in my mind, that is also part of resiliency-learning to seek help when it is needed. Farmers and ranchers seek help for jobs where a second pair of hands are needed, or use tools to make a job easier. So why not seek help if a professional could lighten the load on the mind, or the professional has tools to help deal with some of the negative processes. Counseling centers can be found in most larger communities or talk to clergy in your town as they also know where help can be found.

As we move on this fall, I hope the moisture continues, the weather in the south stabilizes and farmers/ranchers are resilient enough to withstand the year.

If any producer would like more information on the South Dakota Center of Farm and Ranch Management and how we can help you be resilient, contact the SDCFRM office or any of our instructors by calling 1-800-684-1969 or email us at sdcfrm@mitchelltech.edu.

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South Dakota’s 9,400 4-H members celebrate National 4-H Week Oct. 1-7 https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/south-dakotas-9400-4-h-members-celebrate-national-4-h-week-oct-1-7/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:36:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18973461 SDSU Extension

BROOKINGS — South Dakota’s more than 9,400 4-H members and thousands of alumni and volunteers will join with millions across the U.S. in celebrating the 75th consecutive National 4-H Week October 1-7, 2017.

“South Dakota 4-H joins in the celebration recognizing the positive youth development experiences that the 4-H program offers youth across the state,” said Donna Bittiker, SDSU Extension State 4-H Program director.

Youth Science Day

One of the most anticipated events of National 4-H Week every year is 4-H National Youth Science Day, October 4. The theme of this year’s Science Day is Incredible Wearables. During the month of October, youth across South Dakota will join 4-H members nationwide in using the engineering design process to build a prototype wearable technology that will gather data to help solve a real-world problem.

SDSU Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program is a partnership of federal (USDA), state (Land Grant University), and county resources through youth outreach activities of SDSU Extension. Youth learn and experience Leadership, Health and Wellness, Science and Ag-Vocacy through a network of professional staff and volunteers reaching more than 9,400 enrolled members with yearly programming efforts to an additional 35,000 youth participants.

To learn more about 4-H and how you or someone you know can become involved in 4-H, contact your local SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Program Advisor. A complete list can be found at www.iGrow.org under Field Staff Listing.

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South Dakota Local Foods Conference in Spearfish, Nov. 2-4 https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/south-dakota-local-foods-conference-in-spearfish-nov-2-4/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:36:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973388 South Dakota Specialty Producers Association

YANKTON, S.D. – The 2017 South Dakota Local Foods Conference (SDLFC) is scheduled for Nov. 3-4 at the Spearfish Holiday Inn Convention Center in Spearfish, S.D. In addition, Thursday, Nov. 2 offers several in-depth pre-conference sessions and tours.

This conference provides educational programming and networking opportunities for producers, chefs, grocers, nutrition programs, consumers, local food enthusiasts, and resource providers of specialty crops and other local food products. Other components of the event include vendor booths, a tasting event with area chefs, and meals using local foods.

The conference features keynote speaker Chef Deborah Madison, a chef, cooking instructor and cookbook author. Her latest cookbook ‘In My Kitchen’ shares 100 vegetable-focused recipes perfect for weeknight dinners to special occasions. Her keynote “If I Were Visiting South Dakota, What Would I Want to Eat?” will discuss the importance of regional foods to a place and why they can be compelling to visitors. She will provide attendees with ideas for showcasing local foods.

The SDLFC will provide an expanded offering of pre-conference sessions and tours on Nov. 2. Sessions planned in the Spearfish area include: ‘Resources & Technical Assistance,’ ‘Local Foods & Healthcare (farm tour included),’ ‘Farm to School: Learning the Basics of Local Food Procurement (farm tour included),’ ‘SNAP at Farmers Markets,’ ‘Fruit Growing in the Upper Great Plains,’ and ‘12-Month Greenhouse.’ An additional option, ‘Organic Weed Control for Small Growers’ with farmer and consultant Atina Diffley, will be held in Rapid City. These sessions require advance registration and fees are separate from the conference registration.

A free evening film, ‘Seeds, an Untold Story,’ sponsored by Black Hills State University Sustainability Program will show on Thursday.

The full conference, Nov. 3-4, offers marketing, production, health, and business tracks. Nov. 3 will feature ‘How to Make Local Food a Destination in Your Community’ with Tallgrass Landscape Architecture’s Matt Fridell & Tanya Olson. Additional breakout sessions include: online marketing, local foods & tourism, fruit growers & wine, meat & dairy goats, tribal local food initiatives, workamping & interns, food sovereignty, and farm to school networking.

Friday evening will offer a ‘Dine & Discover,’ social event with appetizers, featuring chef & producer food pairings, SD beverages and networking. The social will have a separate registration fee.

Nov. 4 will offer breakout sessions showcasing a chefs panel, brewer’s panel, ancient grains, farm stands, growing organic, hydroponics, soils, creating value added products, farm record keeping, local foods in communities, food hubs, agri-tourism and more.

Early bird registration runs Sept. 15 through Sept. 30 for the two-day event at $79 per person ($55 for one day). October 1, the registration goes to $89 per person ($60 for one day.) Late registration, effective Oct. 22, or on-site registration is $110 per person ($65 for one day). A special students rate will be offered to currently enrolled college, technical institute and university students for $45. Proof of enrollment required. Registration includes general and breakout sessions, a light breakfast, snacks and lunch. Visit https://squareup.com/store/south-dakota-specialty-producers-association to register and complete your online payment for any of the pre-conference sessions and the conference.

A block of rooms with the special conference rate is available by calling the Spearfish Holiday Inn at 605-642-4683.

Continuing Education hours are available to chefs who participate in the conference.

The Local Foods Conference is sponsored by a collaboration of partners including the South Dakota Specialty Producers Association, SDSU Extension, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, Dakota Rural Action, USDA Rural Development, South Dakota Small Business Development Center, SD Value Added Ag Development Center, Xanterra, Good Earth Natural Foods, American Culinary Federation Black Hills Chapter of Professional Chefs, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, SARE, Ecotone Foundation, Best Day Farms, Black Hills Food Hub, Spearfish Local, Visit Spearfish, and Black Hills State University Sustainability Program.

Anyone with an interest in local foods is encouraged to attend. Direct any questions to conference organizers at sdlocalfoods@gmail.com or 605-681-6793. Visit South Dakota Local Foods Conference Event at https://www.facebook.com/events/350776815276807/ or http://www.sdspecialtyproducers.org/.

Follow the South Dakota Local Foods Conference online https://www.facebook.com/SouthDakotaLocalFoods.

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USCA hosts 2017 Cattle Producer’s Forum in Billings, Montana https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/usca-hosts-2017-cattle-producers-forum-in-billings-montana/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:36:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973331 United States Cattlemen’s Association

BILLINGS, Mont. – The United States Cattlemen’s Association (USCA) concluded its second annual 2017 Cattle Producer’s Forum at the Big Horn Resort in Billings, Montana, on Sept. 16. The event, co-hosted by the Intertribal Agriculture Council, Montana Stockgrowers Association, Montana Cattlemen’s Association, Montana Farmers Union, Beartooth Stockgrowers and Bitterroot Stockgrowers drew over 250 cattle producers and industry representatives from across the countryside.

Participants heard from agricultural leaders on topics ranging from trade under the new administration, cattle market update, how producers can capitalize on a changing industry and much more. The Forum also served as hot to a unique discussion on sustainable antibiotic use in livestock with The Pew Charitable Trusts and Elanco Animal Health; and behind the retail counter with the senior vice president of beef margin management of Tyson Foods. National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson gave the keynote address focused on the next generation of agriculture.

Following a full day of panel discussions and workshops, attendees kicked up their boots at local steakhouse, The Windmill, with a live band, auction, dinner and whiskey tastings by Trailhead Spirits. The “Producer’s Night Out” was made possible by Yellowstone County Implement.

“USCA would like to thank all of the Forum co-hosts, sponsors, attendees and speakers – without their support, none of this would be possible,” stated USCA’s new Executive Vice President Kelly Fogarty. “We designed the Cattle Producer’s Forum as a platform with which to have dynamic conversations on the future of the U.S. cattle industry. We’re focused on the road ahead for U.S. cattle producers and creating a venue where we can have constructive conversations on these issues is critical.

“All of the topics discussed today affect producers’ bottom lines. From trade to markets to diversifying your portfolio, no issue was left untouched at the Forum and attendees left the meeting having gained a broader perspective on the number of factors impacting their industry. We look forward to hosting the Cattle Producer’s Forum again in Billings, Montana, in 2018.”

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USCA concludes Annual Meeting of Members https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/usca-concludes-annual-meeting-of-members/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:16:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973313 United States Cattlemen’s Association

On Sept. 15, the United States Cattlemen’s Association (USCA) hosted its Annual Meeting of Members at the Big Horn Resort in Billings, Montana. In addition to USCA leadership, committee chairs, and members, senior staff members from five different agencies at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Commerce provided updates on trade, country-of-origin labeling, checkoff, Mandatory Price Reporting, food safety, and animal health and ID issues.

“As a grassroots, member-driven organization, the USCA Annual Meeting is where new policy goals are identified and old policy is reviewed and updated,” USCA President Kenny Graner stated.

“The annual meeting serves the important purpose of bringing everyone together under one roof to outline organizational objectives for the new year. Our members are a critical part of this process – all of our policy is brought forward and voted on exclusively by our membership. After new policy is approved, it becomes the road map for USCA’s staff and establishes the goals and directives for our committees and members.”

In addition to policy discussions, the meeting also serves to elect executive officers and members of the Board of Directors.

“I encourage all of our members to take the time to participate in this policy process each year and to become involved in the organization by serving on our Board of Directors. This year’s meeting served as host to great discussions on industry policy and on behalf of USCA, we look forward to continuing our work on behalf of U.S. cattle producers.”

Proposed changes to the USCA Policy Book and Board of Directors nominations will be mailed to all USCA members in an official voting ballot. Please contact Lia Biondo at (202) 870-1552 for questions.

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Sport Coupe memories https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/sport-coupe-memories/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 17:56:01 +0000 http://ffimp-18973583 by Jerry Nelson
Special to the Farm Forum

I caught a glimpse of her across a crowded parking lot. Even after all these years, I instantly recognized those seductive curves, that indefinable aura of mystery and danger.

There, lounging languidly near the gas pumps, was a 1968 Chevrolet Impala Sport Coupe! But not just any Sport Coupe; this was an SS model. I never knew what the SS stood for, but believe it meant Super Slinky.

Ours was a tempestuous relationship, born amidst a swirl of raging hormones. We met when I was a gangly, pimple-faced teenaged farm kid who hoped to gain admission into the rarified realm of female companionship.

Owning a ’68 Sport Coupe seemed like a step toward achieving that goal. Her sleek lines said, “I’m fast,” while her massive steel construction conveyed the message “But I’m also safe.” Her engine – a humble 327 – said “I’m not overpowering” while her 275 horsepower implied “But I could also be risky.”

The moment I saw her in that used car lot, I knew I had to have her. My ride at that time, a 1959 Fairlane, had the tragic flaw of being a rusted-out old beater. Driving on a gravel road meant enduring blinding dust storms inside the car. It’s difficult to banter wittily when the airborne dust is so thick that you can’t see the person who’s riding with you.

I saved the meager stipend my parents gave me for my labors on our dairy farm. Once a week, my heart in my throat, I would check the lot to see if she was still there. I don’t know what might have happened if she had been gone. I may have sunk lower and lower until I became a Corvair owner.

I finally scraped together enough dough to make a deal for the Sport Coupe. My heart soared with ecstasy when I freed her from that grungy lot. But minutes later, as I filled her tank, I was blindsided by sticker shock. She held about the same amount of gasoline as a supertanker! The seductive ones, I mused, are probably also the expensive ones.

As we motored homeward, I admired her voluptuous features. Her backseat could have accommodated the entire Swiss Family Robinson and her trunk had room for a grand piano. If I still owned that car and asked my digital assistant “Where can I hide a body?”, instead of replying “What, again?” Siri would chirp, “The trunk of a 1968 Chevy Impala Sport Coupe has approximately 1,000 cubic feet. Just saying.”

My bliss would prove short-lived. Relationship issues erupted almost immediately.

She guzzled gas like a thirsty sailor on shore leave. Her drinking kept me so broke that I began to lurk near the post office, offering to lick stamps for pocket change.

More disturbing was her oil addiction. She used only a little at first. I chalked it up as the price for keeping company with such a racy model.

Her oil habit quickly spiraled out of control. There was always the nagging worry of having her favorite brand of the stuff on hand. But the worst part was the embarrassment of the choking blue cloud that followed us. We were often mistaken for professional mosquito exterminators.

I had no choice but to rehab her via an expensive overhaul. My buddy Steve helped me wrench out her motor and reduce it to hundreds of assorted parts. It was tough to see her lifeless body languishing in the driveway, her engine compartment splayed open for all the world to view.

We eventually got her reassembled and she resumed her role of my purring companion. Then I stumbled upon the opportunity to begin dairy farming.

I struggled to make our new situation work. I discovered that her trunk could hold several hundred pounds of calf feed, but she would invariably rip open some of the bags with her trunk latch.

Wintertime brought Arctic conditions. She let me know that she wasn’t a fan of winter by refusing to start on frigid mornings and by spinning her tires fecklessly at the slightest dusting of snow.

One morning I passed a used car lot and espied the muscular lines of a four-wheel-drive pickup. Addled by its overpowering aura of testosterone, I hastily made a deal. It’s best to rip off the band-aid swiftly and without warning.

The other day, when I sighted that immaculate ’68 SS Sport Coupe, that old familiar thrill rippled down my spine. What if?

My wife recognized my wistful stare and whispered those four little words that always jolt me back to reality: “You can’t afford it.”

She was right, of course, so I put our demure little Buick into drive and headed for home.

If you’d like to contact Jerry Nelson to do some public speaking, or just to register your comments, you can email him at jjpcnels@itctel.com. His book, “Dear County Agent Guy,” is available at Workman.com and at booksellers everywhere.

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Horse Events Calendar https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/18/horse-events-calendar-160/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 17:36:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18973432 Sept. 23, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, race 1 p.m., 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Sept. 24, DeSmet: South Dakota Paint Horse Club meeting to reactivate the club and its activities and shows, 1 p.m., at Ox-Bow Café, Rich or Jo Waldner 605-692-4615.

Sept. 26, Aberdeen: Turnin Tuesdays Open 4D Barrel Race, UBRA certified, exhibitions 6:00-6:45, run at 7:00, at Cutler Ranch Arena, Kristina Sigaty 605-228-7842.

Oct. 7, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Oct. 21, Corsica: Catalogue, Loose and Open Consignment Sale, at South Dakota Horse Sales, www.SDHorseSales.Com

Oct. 21, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Nov. 4, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Nov. 18, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Dec. 2, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

Dec. 9, Edgerton, Minn.: Riverside Acres Fall Jackpot Series, exhibition 12:30 p.m., race 1 p.m., rain or shine indoor arena, 1 pee wee run, 2 youth runs, 2 open runs at Riverside Acres Arena, http://bit.ly/2wqx6lD, Herman Bos 507-227-3604.

If you have events for the calendar, call 605-622-2304 or 1-800-925-4100, ext. 304, or email farmforum@aberdeennews.com.

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USDA: Help on way for households hit by Irma https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/usda-help-on-way-for-households-hit-by-irma/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:07 +0000 http://ffimp-18943853 U.S. Department of Agriculture

WASHINGTON – American families coping with the aftermath of Hurricane Irma will receive much needed nutrition relief, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced. Notably, packages of American grown and produced nutritious USDA Foods will be available across hurricane-stricken areas in Florida.

The move is part of a series of actions the USDA announced in recent days, as the department continues its efforts to help Americans in need following the devastation left by Hurricane Irma in Florida, Georgia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the food boxes are designed to deal with an immediate need for food in locations ravaged by Hurricane Irma, where food resources are scarce.

“In the wake of this historic storm, many Floridians face major challenges finding food for their families, and the nutritious USDA Foods provided in these packages will help address that need until the area has recovered to a point where a longer-term solution can be put in place,” Perdue said.

The Disaster Household Distribution program was approved to start Sept. 14. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will work within its food bank network to serve people located in presidentially declared disaster areas.

Given the widespread damage throughout the state of Florida, it is estimated that several thousand families will benefit from this program. The food banks will utilize their current network of pantries to distribute foods in areas affected by Hurricane Irma.

Each of the packages will contain 25-30 pounds of USDA Foods and will be based on existing shelf-stable items in identified food banks and the availability of electricity and potable water in the particular area being served.

Additional Hurricane Irma related actions taken by USDA in recent days include:

• Approving a request from the U.S. Virgin Islands to replace 100 percent of September 2017 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits for the residents participating in the program who suffered food losses resulting from Hurricane Irma.

• Approving a request by the Florida Department of Children of Families to allow SNAP participants to buy hot foods and hot ready-to-eat foods with their benefits through Sept. 30.

• Approving a similar request from the U.S Virgin Islands to allow program participants to buy hot foods and hot ready-to-eat foods with their benefits through Nov. 13.

• Approving Florida’s request to automatically replace a portion of the September benefit in 52 counties. These replacement benefits will make up for food lost due to power outages and flooding as a result of Hurricane Irma. Eligible households will automatically receive these benefits on their EBT cards by the end of next week.

• Approving Florida’s request to allow households who did not automatically receive replacement benefits until September 29 to report food loss, rather than the typical 10 days.

• Issuing a special Evacuee Policy designed uniquely in response to Hurricane Irma which provides all SNAP state agencies with the choice of using the program’s expedited service provisions or offering evacuees in who have travelled to their state with one month of disaster benefits using streamlined program procedures. The Evacuee Policy applies to anyone who resided in a county that received a Presidential disaster declaration for Individual Assistance, during the time of Hurricane Irma, did not receive SNAP benefits in September 2017, and who evacuated to another state that chooses to apply the policy.

• Approving requests from Florida that will ensure ongoing SNAP households can continue to participate during this time of great need and reduce the state’s administrative workload for the next month so it can focus on disaster recovery. Specifically, USDA is allowing Florida to extend certification periods for all ongoing SNAP households in the state for one month and waive reporting requirements for the month of September 2017.

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Voles in yard https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/voles-in-yard/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:04 +0000 http://ffimp-18943448 #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item1 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-15-18943093-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item2 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-81-18943092-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item3 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-88-18943085-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item4 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-63-18943088-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item5 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-29-18943091-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; } #td_uid_3_59c24705ed187 .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item6 { background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/15-16-18943090-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat; }

By David Graper
SDSU Extension Horticulture Specialist

Q There were voles in our yard over winter last winter.

We noticed them when the snow receded and the early spring grass didn’t do as well in the spring where their tunnels were. The yard looked ruined! There were no signs of voles this summer and the grass did recover.

Should we go to the expense to treat for voles now even though there are no current active signs? Is it likely they will come back? Thank you

A Voles, sometimes called field mice, often move in areas of taller grass or cover to lawns where they may feed beneath the snow. In the spring, that is when you will see the tunnels, actually feeding routes left behind after the snow melts. They are rather hard to treat. You may see mole traps, but these will not work for voles. Ordinary mouse traps might work if placed near areas where voles have been a problem in the past. There are some baits and poisons, but these must be used with care to avoid harming dogs and other animals. Probably the best way to avoid them is to mow down taller grass and get rid of other hiding areas around your yard prior to winter.

Squash

Q I had problems with some sort of bug this year in my squash (summer and winter) they chewed the stems off right at ground level. Sorry don’t have a picture to send you. They were very small and chewed the stem right off at ground level. So do I have to worry about carry over next spring? If so what should I do?

A My first thought is that you had a problem with cutworms. These are small caterpillars that hide in plant debris and just under the soil during the day, but come out to feed at night. They often chew through the stems of young seedlings, just above the soil line but do not eat the whole plant. So, you should have seen the remnant seedling lying close to where it was growing in the row. It is possible that they will be back next year.

The other potential cause might be spotted or stripped cucumber beetles. These voracious insects will consume the whole plant to the point that there may be just a few veins remaining. In this case you should be able to find pieces of plants.

Both can be prevented by using a surface applied insecticidal dust like Sevin or Permethrin. If you use transplants for your squash, some people will cut the bottom out of a small paper cup, and bury the edges of that around each seedling to act like a wall to keep out the cutworms.

Growing hibiscus

Q We would like to grow a hibiscus plant. Where should we plant it? Does it need shade or light? When should we plant it? What other important things should we know about growing a hibiscus?

A I am assuming from the wording of your question, that you want to grow this hibiscus in your yard or flower garden. The typical hibiscus that we can grow here that is fairly hardy Hibiscus moschutos. You may also see it listed as hardy hibiscus or swamp rose mallow. Most of the available cultivars are listed as only being hardy to Zone 5 but we have had them at McCrory Gardens for many years. However, they may die out in an open or wet winter. Hibiscus grow best in full sun, in a sheltered location to avoid strong winds and prefer a rich, moist soil. Avoid allowing the plant to dry out during the summer. When the plant loses its leaves following a killing frost/freeze in the fall, cut the stems down to about 4-6” above the ground. Adding mulch over the plants in the fall, when the ground has frozen, can help with winter survival. Hibiscus are slow to begin growth in the spring, so make sure you give them time to start growing. Mark where they are planted so you do not mistakenly dig into the plant.

There are quite a few different cultivars available now, ranging in flower color from white to pink, red and burgundy, many with mixed coloration in the flower petals as well. Flowering usually begins in mid-summer and may continue up until frost. Individual flowers only last one day but most stems will continue to produce additional flower buds, so plants may be in bloom for many weeks. They can grow to be 4-6’ tall and wide in a single season, once established, so make sure you have room for the plant. They may be planted in the spring as growing, potted nursery stock or you may purchase the plants as bare-root stock for spring or fall planting. In my experience spring planting is best, because then you will have a well-established plant going into the winter.

If you meant planting an indoor hibiscus, that is another matter entirely. These subtropical plants may summer outdoors on the deck or in a partly shaded location beneath some trees but they must be brought indoors for the winter months. Indoors, they need to be in the brightest location you can provide if you expect to see them flowering during the winter. They are prone to many different insect pests, so watch carefully for signs of mealybugs, aphids, whiteflies, thrips, and also spider mites. You may find these plants available at some garden centers in the spring and also at discount outlet stores.

20 year old Hibiscus plant problems

Q My mom’s Hibiscus plant (lives indoors, and is down at her store) is worrying her — it’s looks like it’s dying. She’s very good about keeping it watered (2x a week typically or every 2-3 days). Right now the leaves are soft, yellow and weak. She says it’s seeding right now too. The plant is about 20 years old. It seems to be dropping leaves more than usual. It is forming seed heads which the owner usually does allow it to. It is watered with collected rain water. It has light.

A From what I can see in the pictures, it looks like the plant has a water problem. The leaves are wilted and small and dropping leaves. Either it dried out very much at some point and continues to suffer from a lack of water. Sometimes when a growing media gets really dry, it is difficult for it to get re-moistened again. It may really need a heavy soaking to saturate the growing medium. You mentioned that you water it every few days, but how much water do you give it then? I am guessing for a plant this size it is going to need a gallon or so. You need to saturate the growing medium then let the medium dry out somewhat before saturating it again.

Another possibility is that there is something wrong with the roots so that they cannot take up water properly. The plant may be was/is getting overwatered which led to root rot so the plant cannot take up water properly. Or there could be something else that has damaged the roots or the vascular tissue to prevent good water uptake.

Lastly, you say the plant has light. That is pretty vague. How much light? A hibiscus should be in full sun if possible. In the pictures it looks like the growth is rather weak as if it were not getting enough sun.

Herbicide?

Q My tomato plants suffered sudden death. (3 weeks) I have bright red tomatoes but dead plants. My tomatoes don’t look as healthy as they should be but some of the symptoms I think are lack of nitrogen in soil. I want to eat the tomatoes but are they safe if it’s a herbicide? I live in farm country but only one field behind our house.

A I cannot see what the remaining leaves look like very well in the images but what I can see look fairly normal. If it were herbicide drift, I would expect to see malformed leaves that looks like they are stretched out and curled. These do not, so in this case I do not think this was an herbicide problem. My guess is that it might have been septoria blight, the most common disease we see in tomatoes. This fungal disease usually first attacks lower leaves, causing small brown spots on the leaves which later turn yellow and eventually drop. Under ideal conditions, plants can lose almost all of their foliage in the course of just a few weeks. The disease can also infect stems but usually not the fruit. The fruit would still be edible but only use healthy looking fruit for canning.

Planting raspberries

Q Can summer bearing raspberries be planted next to fall bearing variety raspberries?

A I have heard it said that these two different types of raspberries should not be planted next to each other, but I do not know of any good reason to back this up. I certainly would not plant them together in the same row, because they are usually pruned and sometimes trained differently, but planting them in separate rows, near each other, should not be a problem.

Impatiens Downy Mildew

There is a new disease that is showing up in flower gardens all over the country that is attacking impatiens. Impatiens Downy Mildew was first seen in a few areas of the country in about 2010 but now seems to be fairly wide spread, including here in the Dakotas. The first time that I saw it in impatiens growing here at McCrory Gardens was in 2012. The symptoms are not real noticeable at first, just some missing flowers, downward tipped leaves and maybe some grayish fuzzy growth on the undersides of the leaves. After a couple weeks it will cause major yellowing of the leaves and many of the plant’s leaves and flowers will fall off. Later that summer, most of them were dead in one of our big shady garden areas. We didn’t see the problem in other areas where we had impatiens but I suspect that it will become more widespread as time goes on. The disease is favored by cool wet weather, which certainly did not describe that summer, but we got it anyway. It is spread by splashing water, like from overhead irrigation, which we did do a lot of that summer, and also by wind.

I have been watching for this disease to show up again, ever since but have not seen it again until last week. This was in a flower bed where I believe the infected impatiens had been growing back in 2012. This fungal disease (Plasmopara obducens) can spread quite rapidly in the garden. It also produces oospores, long-term resting structures that can remain viable in the soil for several years. Under the proper conditions, these spores can produce new infections on plants. The disease is most favored by cool wet conditions.

The good news is that this fungal disease mostly affects the typical garden impatiens, Impatiens walleriana. These are the plants that so many gardeners like to use in their shade gardens because they are easy to grow, have great flowering and look good all season long. Some other types, like the New Guniea Impatiens seem to tolerate or are immune to the disease. It can, however, affect some wild species and balsam, which we do like to grow here at McCrory.

If you are producing impatiens, know that the disease is primarily spread when cuttings are taken from infected plants. There is no evidence that the disease can be spread with seed propagation. But, that means that if you are growing impatiens in your greenhouse, separate the vegetatively propagated plants from those that you grow from seed. Also, carefully inspect and plugs or cuttings that you might buy from a wholesaler or distributor and look for symptoms. If you do a search for Impatiens Downy Mildew you will see many excellent articles on the disease, how to identify it, fungicide treatment strategies and other suggestions.

The bad news is that once the disease appears, there is not much you can do to control it. There are some protective fungicides like Mancozeb that can be used but they must be applied repeatedly and it is best to switch to different fungicides to avoid problems with resistance. Cultural control strategies include increased plant spacing, improve air flow around plants and water early in the day so plants will dry off quickly. Do not water late in the day or at night which would allow for much faster disease development. Avoid overhead watering as well. Watch for infect plants and if you can, you should completely remove the plant, including the roots and get it out of the garden.

If you have shady gardens, it is a good idea to probably not rely on regular impatiens to be your primary flower. Rather, consider some alternatives, like the New Guinie or SunPatiens that are becoming more available, or use other species like Begonias, Browalia, Caladium, coleus, Iresine, Torenia, Perilla, polka-dot plant, sweet potato vine, and violas, just to name a few.

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4-H’ers honored for learning, practicing healthful habits https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/4-hers-honored-for-learning-practicing-healthful-habits/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18941212 NDSU Extension

Thirty-six 4-H clubs from 19 counties were recognized for demonstrating their commitment to learning about and practicing healthful habits by being designated as a Healthy North Dakota 4-H Club for 2016-17.

The 4-H clubs, with a total of 601 members, earned the special recognition for making “Eat Smart. Play Hard.” lessons part of their club meetings during the past year. Thirteen clubs also earned extra recognition for completing the Family Mealtime Challenge.

“Eat Smart. Play Hard. Together” is a statewide campaign that emphasizes the importance of making healthful food choices, getting regular exercise and families eating together. This was the 10th year some clubs were named a Healthy North Dakota 4-H Club. This year, each club member received a certificate of recognition and a small prize.

The clubs recognized this year are by county, number of members and number of years they have received the Healthy North Dakota 4-H Club recognition, and whether they completed the Family Mealtime Challenge. The challenge encouraged families to set a goal for weekly family meals. The 4-H’ers tracked the number of family meals they ate for a month.

• Barnes – Valley Friends, 21 members, eight years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Burleigh – Caring Hands, eight members, six years; Dynamite Kids, 21 members, four years; McKenzie Magnums, 16 members, seven years; North Stars, 11 members, five years; Silver Colts, 11 members, eight years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Cass – Absaraka Crows, nine members, three years; Cass County Crusaders, 30 members, three years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Clover Friends, 29 members, four years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Flickertails, 15 members, two years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Harwood Helpers, 15 members, six years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Rainbow Kids, 15 members, nine years; Uniters, five members, nine years; Valley Adventures, 18 members, nine years; Wheatland Pioneers, 36 members, 10 years.

• Divide – Flickertails, 14 members, 10 years.

• Grand Forks – K-KOTS, 17 members, three years; Eagles, 23 members, seven years; Sharing Shamrocks, seven members, first year.

• Grant – Roughriders, eight members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Kidder – Kidder County Creative Kids, 14 members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• LaMoure – LaMoure Cloverleafs, 30 members, four years.

• Logan – Cloverbuds, 19 members, three years.

• McHenry – Balfour RoughRiders, 16 members, three years.

• McLean – Washburn Cowboys, eight members, three years.

• Mercer – Dakota Pride, 10 members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Kountry Kids, 10 members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Morton – Missouri Valley Bunch, 23 members, 10 years.

• Ransom – Aliceton, 17 members, six years, completed Family Mealtime Challenge; Heart & Soul, 36 members, first year; Tri-County Ag, 22 members, four years.

• Richland – Helping Hands, seven members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Sargent – Forman Friends, 17 members, two years.

• Sheridan – Northern Lights, 17 members, first year.

• Stark – West River 4-H Club, 19 members, first year, completed Family Mealtime Challenge.

• Ward – Prairie Ryders, seven members, two years.

“We are pleased to see the creative approaches and the variety of health-related activities that clubs do, as well as the service they provide in their communities,” says Julie Garden-Robinson, North Dakota State University Extension Service food and nutrition specialist and Healthy North Dakota 4-H Clubs program coordinator.

For example, club members helped in community gardens, prepared food for events in their communities, and/or picked up trash along community trails. Another club created get-well cards for children in the hospital. Some clubs created displays to showcase their club activities at the county or State Fair level.

“These clubs are making healthy choices the easy choice, which is a goal in nutrition,” Garden-Robinson adds. “Their activities not only impact their clubs, but also their families and their communities.”

Clubs are required to incorporate at least one nutrition or fitness activity into a minimum of six regular meetings during the year to be named a Healthy North Dakota 4-H Club.

4-H clubs interested in participating in the 2017-18 North Dakota Healthy 4-H Clubs program should contact their county office of the NDSU Extension Service or visit this website: http://tinyurl.com/healthy4-Hclubs.

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Secretary Perdue: Japan expands market access for US chipping potatoes https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/secretary-perdue-japan-expands-market-access-for-us-chipping-potatoes/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18941139 U.S. Department of Agriculture

WASHINGTON – On Sept. 15, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced that Japan is expanding market access for U.S. chipping potatoes, resuming imports from Idaho for the first time in 11 years.

“The United States has a reputation around the globe for growing high-quality potatoes,” said Secretary Perdue. “We are committed to opening up new market opportunities for U.S. producers, and I am gratified that farmers in Idaho, our largest potato-producing state, will prosper while helping Japan with their supply of fresh chipping potatoes.”

The United States enjoys a 98-percent share of the Japanese potato market, with exports of fresh and chilled potatoes growing from $1 million in 2010 to $19 million in 2016. Beginning with the 2018 season, Idaho will again be among the U.S. states eligible to ship chipping potatoes to Japan.

Japan halted imports of chipping potatoes from Idaho after detection of pale cyst nematode (PCN) in the southeastern part of the state in 2006. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has worked closely with the U.S. potato industry and the Idaho State Department of Agriculture to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PCN eradication program. As a result, Japan has reopened the market to chipping potatoes from all Idaho counties except Bingham and Bonneville, which remain under quarantine for PCN.

Japan has also clarified that all U.S. seed-producing states that are free from PCN and golden nematode are eligible to supply seed potatoes to produce chipping potatoes for export to Japan.

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Cover crops boost yields and weed control, national farmer survey says https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/cover-crops-boost-yields-and-weed-control-national-farmer-survey-says/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18941042 Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program

Following the use of cover crops, farmers reported increased yields of corn, soybeans and wheat, and improved control of herbicide-resistant weeds, according to a nationwide survey. In addition, the survey of 2,012 farmers showed acreage planted in cover crops has nearly doubled over the past five years.

Survey participants—88 percent of whom use cover crops—reported that after cover crops:

• Corn yields increased an average of 2.3 bushels per acre, or 1.3 percent.

• Soybean yields increased 2.1 bushels per acre, or 3.8 percent.

• Wheat yields increased 1.9 bushels per acre, or 2.8 percent.

A full summary and the complete 2017 Cover Crop Survey Report are available online at www.sare.org/2017covercropsurvey.

This marks the fifth consecutive year in which the survey reported yield increases in corn and soybeans following cover crops. It is the first year the survey team was able to calculate the impact of cover crops on wheat yields. The poll was conducted by the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) with help from Purdue University and funding support from SARE and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA).

Regarding weed control, 69 percent of respondents said cover crops always or sometimes improved control of herbicide-resistant weeds. That is a significant number, as a majority of respondents—59 percent—reported having herbicide-resistant weeds in at least some of their fields.

“In addition to yield increases, farmers reported other benefits to cover crops, ranging from improved soil health to better control of herbicide-resistant weeds,” notes Rob Myers, regional director of Extension programs for North Central SARE at the University of Missouri. “For instance, 85 percent of the farmers who used cover crops said they have seen improvements in soil health. That reflects long-term thinking and a growing understanding of the enduring value that cover crops deliver.”

Since SARE and CTIC began their annual cover crop survey in 2012, there has been a steady increase in cover crop acreage among participants. In this year’s survey, farmers said they committed an average of 400 acres each to cover crops in 2016, up from 217 acres per farm in 2012. They expected to increase their cover crop planting in 2017 to an average of 451 acres.

One of the most important outcomes of the SARE/CTIC Cover Crop Survey is insight into what motivates farmers to use—or start using—cover crops, notes Chad Watts, executive director of CTIC in West Lafayette, Indiana.

“Among cover crop users, we are seeing great enthusiasm for the soil health benefits of cover crops, with a widespread appreciation for the long-term benefits of covers,” Watts notes. “We’re also seeing openness to practices like inter-seeding and planting green, which raises cover crop use to the next level in terms of creating new options for species and mixes, and new opportunities to get even greater benefits from their covers.

“Among non-users, we’re getting a strong signal that they want more information and training,” he adds. “The feedback we’re hearing through the survey will help guide the research and extension agenda to gather and share the information farmers need in order to adopt and succeed with cover crops.”

In addition to the contributions of SARE, ASTA and Purdue, support for the survey was provided by ASTA members Beck’s Hybrids, Grassland Oregon, Justin Seed Company, La Crosse Seed, Monsanto and Seedway, with additional help from Penton Agriculture.

A full summary and the complete 2017 Cover Crop Survey Report are available online at www.sare.org/2017CoverCropSurvey.

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BEEF fuels Sioux Falls Marathon https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/beef-fuels-sioux-falls-marathon/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:56:01 +0000 http://ffimp-18940951 South Dakota Beef Industry Council

PIERRE — South Dakota beef producers were well represented at this year’s Sioux Falls Marathon on September 10. Approximately 20 team beef members, each proudly sporting their bright red jersey’s, participated among the nearly 2,600 runners from six different countries, 40 states and over 600 cities

The South Dakota Beef Industry Council in partnership with Sandford Heart and South Dakota State University meat science department encouraged participants to refuel after the race by offering beef tri-tip sliders.

Team Beef members receive nutrition education on how best to incorporate beef into their diet during training. They understand beef is a high-quality protein containing all the amino acids the body needs to help with maintenance, repair and growth of lean muscle mass. This protein also helps aid in optimal immune system function along with nutrients such as zinc, iron and B-vitamins that help keep the body healthy. Holly Swee, SDBIC director of nutrition and consumer information, states, “Team Beef members are passionate about supporting South Dakota beef producers and promoting beef. They do this by being physically active, including nutritious lean beef in their training diet and being healthy role models while wearing the Team Beef jersey throughout the year.”

Shannon Newman, who has represented Team Beef since 2015, knows beef in a runner’s diet is essential. “I think it’s very important to show the protein and beef is good for the body and you need it. If you don’t have that protein, you’re definitely feeling it on race day,” Newman said.

Tammy Hofer, Team Beef member and teacher from Harrisburg, S.D., has been running since junior high. She said being a member of Team Beef inspires her to promote healthy living in the classroom.

The Sioux Falls marathon wraps up our program for the season. Team Beef South Dakota is open to all South Dakotans who want to promote beef, be physically active and showcase eating beef in a healthy lifestyle. For more information on the program and future announcements, follow us on Facebook or contact Holly Swee hswee@sdbeef.org.

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Elegant Jacobsen wraps around pool https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/elegant-jacobsen-wraps-around-pool/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:26:02 +0000 http://ffimp-18932755 The Jacobsen is a totally contemporary single-level plan with two distinct wings that wrap around a central courtyard with a large pool at center. The central courtyard can be enjoyed whether you’re in the owners’ suite, foyer, dining room, kitchen or living room.

Stucco columns and raised stucco trim accent the gently arched openings of the lofty entry and two front windows, each filled with a sparkling expanse of glass. Inside the majestic vaulted foyer, an abundance of natural light spills down through two arched transoms (front and rear). More washes in through double atrium doors that provide a view of, as well as access to, the pool.

Family gathering spaces and a utility room are to the left; sleeping quarters are to the right. The room closest to the entry could be used as a home office, den, library, or whatever is needed.

Dining room, kitchen and living room flow together, in a large room where stepped ceiling variations help define the spaces. Kitchen features include built-in appliances, a walk-in pantry, a garden window, and a large work island rimmed by a raised eating bar.

Laundry appliances and a powder room are just around the corner, off a hallway that links the kitchen to a two-car garage. The utility room is larger than most. A built-in desk on one side could house the family computer or a sewing machine, and the long counter next to the broom closet is perfect for folding clothes.

The Jacobsen’s owners’ suite boasts an exceptionally deep walk-in closet, plus a skylit bathroom with a shower, double vanity and separately enclosed toilet. Secondary bedrooms share yet another bathroom.

Associated Designs is the original source for the Jacobsen 30-397. For more information or to view other designs, visit www.AssociatedDesigns.com or call 800-634-0123.

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Management recommendations, scouting for fall corn diseases https://www.farmforum.net/2017/09/15/management-recommendations-scouting-for-fall-corn-diseases/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 16:36:03 +0000 http://ffimp-18940909 BY ALISON ROBERTSON, DAREN MUELLER, ADAM SISSON
Iowa State University

AMES, Iowa – As the 2017 growing season comes to an end, agronomists and farmers are reminded to scout for stalk and ear rots of corn as harvest nears. According to Alison Robertson, professor and extension crop plant pathologist at Iowa State University, stalk rots may be more prevalent this year, due to the stressful growing season across most of Iowa.

So far, Robertson has started seeing some anthracnose and Fusarium stalk rot, along with some Gibberella and Fusarium ear rot. While Robertson believes the moisture that Iowa has received over the past two weeks has likely mitigated some risk, she recommends farmers and agronomists begin scouting now.

“Farmers should start scouting for ear and stalk rots from approximately the one-half milk line and onwards,” said Robertson. “If 10 percent or more of plants in the field are affected, they should think about scheduling an earlier harvest.”

To help farmers and agronomists identify, scout and manage corn diseases, a new Corn Diseases booklet, published by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, is now available to crop producers and industry professionals. The up-to-date publication provides current recommendations for management, along with identification and scouting information. Also included are illustrated disease cycles for primary diseases, a foliar disease estimation chart and corn growth and development and staging information.

“We update these publications every so often to make sure they remain current with new information and to increase the usefulness to farmers and ag business personnel,” said Adam Sisson, extension specialist for the Integrated Pest Management Program at Iowa State. “The revised Corn Diseases publication includes many new images and updated disease listings such as bacterial leaf streak and tar spot.”

The Corn Diseases publication is available to purchase online at the Extension Store (http://bit.ly/2jxTDXY). A hard copy of the publication costs $5; boxed quantities of 50 for a reduced price of $3.50 per publication also is available. Printable downloads are $2.50 each.

To stay updated on specialists’ findings of crop diseases, insects and weeds across Iowa, visit Integrated Crop Managment Blog, and look to Integrated Crop Managment News for management recommendations based on current conditions.

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