Crop and Livestock Conditions Report South Dakota

ff_admin
Farm Forum

For the week ending April 14, 2013, snow and freezing rain brought badly needed moisture to parts of the state and kept temperatures colder than normal, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, South Dakota Field Office. Average snow depth across the state was reported at 6.6 inches. Last week’s storm made calving conditions difficult and caused spring field work to be put on hold. With only 0.7 day suitable for fieldwork, producers anticipate a late planting season for most crops. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 17 percent very short, 27 percent short, 52 percent adequate, and 4 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 39 percent very short, 44 percent short, 16 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Major agricultural activities during the week included caring for livestock and preparing for spring planting.

Field Crops Report: Winter wheat condition rated 30 percent very poor, 43 percent poor, 22 percent fair, 5 percent good, and 0 percent excellent. Six percent of spring wheat has been seeded, compared to 79 percent last year and 26 percent average. Oats seeding rated 16 percent complete, behind 76 percent last year and 24 percent average. Only 1 percent of barley has been seeded, behind 55 percent last year and 16 percent average.

Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Calving was 60 percent complete and lambing 78 percent complete. Only 3 percent of cattle were reported as moved to pasture. Cattle and calf conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 27 percent fair, 57 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. Cattle and calves death loss reported at 9 percent below average, 82 percent average, and 9 percent above average. Sheep and lamb conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 18 percent fair, 66 percent good, and 12 percent excellent. Sheep and lambs death loss reported at 7 percent below average, 90 percent average, and 3 percent above average. Pasture and range conditions rated 29 percent very poor, 35 percent poor, 30 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 0 percent excellent. Hay and forage supplies rated 27 percent very short, 33 percent short, 38 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus. Stock water supplies were 23 percent very short, 35 percent short, 39 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus.

North Dakota

For the week ending April 14, 2013, a weekend blizzard dumped from 4 to 20 inches of heavy, wet snow across much of the state, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, North Dakota Field Office. This new snow will delay even further the start of fieldwork and may cause a higher likelihood of spring flooding. Also, poor conditions caused increased stress to livestock producers who were calving and lambing. The entire state experienced temperatures last week that were at least 9 degrees below normal.

With the recent snow cover, averaging 10.4 inches across the state, there was only 0.1 day suitable for fieldwork. Spring planting is being delayed further by the continued winter like weather. Reports indicated that, on average, producers intended to begin fieldwork by May 2. Although moisture supplies improved, the 2013 planting progress continues to be well behind last year’s early progress and also behind the 5 year average. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 4 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 6 percent very short, 28 percent short, 60 percent adequate, and 6 percent surplus.

Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Calving was 64 percent complete, while lambing was 74 percent complete and shearing 91 percent complete. Cattle and calf conditions rated 3 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 23 percent fair, 57 percent good, and 10 percent excellent. Cattle and calves death loss reported at 10 percent below average, 82 percent average, and 8 percent above average. Sheep and lamb conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 6 percent poor, 21 percent fair, 63 percent good, and 8 percent excellent. Sheep and lambs death loss reported at 16 percent below average, 79 percent average, and 5 percent above average. Hay and forage supplies rated 3 percent very short, 25 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus. Stock water supplies rated 5 percent very short, 14 percent short, 77 percent adequate, and 4 percent surplus.

Minnesota

Winter weather conditions were persistent during the week ending April 14th, 2013. A noteworthy storm brought widespread heavy snow, rain and ice late in the week. High winds caused tree damage and power outages in southwest Minnesota. The snow covered fields in the northern parts are not showing signs of significant melting. This continues to worry farmers about the potential of flooding from rapid snow melt. The consistent rain and snow provided much needed topsoil moisture relief where the soil would allow for absorption. Farm activities included spring calving, repairing storm damage, equipment maintenance, and purchasing supplies.

For the week ending April 14, 2013, only 0.1 days were rated suitable for fieldwork statewide, compared with last year’s 5.0. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 5 percent very short, 17 percent short, 61 percent adequate, and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 23 percent very short, 43 percent short, 31 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus. Producers anticipate full scale fieldwork to begin on May 1st. Pasture conditions were rated 27 percent very poor, 17 percent poor, 35 percent fair and 21 percent good.

Iowa

Precipitation was received across Iowa during the week ending April 14, 2013, ranging from rain in southern Iowa to rain, snow and ice in northern Iowa. The much needed precipitation helped replenish top soil moisture. The wet conditions limited fieldwork across the state. Statewide there was an average of 0.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 7 percent very short, 19 percent short, 65 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 27 percent very short, 42 percent short and 29 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

Oat planting was 20 percent complete, far behind last year’s 84 percent and the five-year average of 51 percent.

Pasture and range condition rated 24 percent very poor, 29 percent poor, 35 percent fair and 11 percent good and 1 percent excellent. The wet and cool weather has made calving more difficult.

Iowa experienced its wettest week since July 2010 with a statewide average of 2.90 inches of rain compared to a weekly normal of 0.78 inches. The heaviest rains fell from Monday (8th) evening through Thursday (11th) morning when two to three inch rains were widespread over northern Iowa.

Soil temperatures as of Sunday (14th) varied from the low 40’s north to upper 40’s south.

Nebraska

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) – Last week’s rain and snow hampered work in Nebraska’s fields but boosted soil moisture.

The U.S. Agriculture Department said Monday in its weekly agricultural survey report that despite the rain and snow the topsoil moisture was rated 53 percent very short or short. Subsoil moisture was rated 93 percent short or very short.

About 12 percent of Nebraska’s wheat crop was rated in good or excellent condition, while 50 percent was rated poor or very poor.

The report says 58 percent of the expected oat crop has been planted. That trails last year’s figure of 73 percent but is ahead of the 51 percent average by this date.