Barlow is the leading spring wheat variety in North Dakota

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Farm Forum

FARGO, N.D. — Barlow is the leading spring wheat variety in North Dakota for the third straight year. It accounts for 15.7 percent of the 5.90 million acres of spring wheat planted in 2014. Prosper ranks second with 11.7 percent of the spring wheat acreage. SY Soren represents 10.4 percent of the spring wheat planted and ranks third. Faller ranks fourth with 8.8 percent of the spring wheat acres planted. Glenn accounts for 8.2 percent of the spring wheat acreage and ranks fifth. These top five varieties account for 54.8 percent of the spring wheat planted in 2014. North Dakota continues to rank first in spring wheat planted acreage in the United States, with 46.4 percent of the nation’s estimated 12.7 million acres planted.

Divide is the leading Durum wheat variety for the sixth consecutive year. Divide accounts for 37.0 percent of the 870,000 acres planted compared with 33.4 in 2013 and 30.4 percent in 2012. Alkabo and Mountrail rank second and third, respectively, with 16.2 and 12.9 percent of the Durum wheat acres planted. Tioga ranks fourth in Durum wheat acreage with 9.7 percent, and Lebsock ranks fifth with 7.5 percent. These top five varieties account for 83.3 percent of the Durum wheat acreage in North Dakota. Once again, North Dakota ranks first in Durum wheat planted acreage in the United States with 59.2 percent of the nation’s estimated 1.47 million acres planted.

Jerry accounts for 25.5 percent of the 2014 winter wheat planted acreage in North Dakota, marking the eleventh consecutive year as the most popular winter wheat variety. Decade and WB Matlock rank second and third, respectively, with 17.5 and 6.9 percent of the winter wheat acres planted. Overland ranks fourth with 6.2 percent of the winter wheat acreage planted in North Dakota. These top four varieties account for 56.1 percent of the 800,000 acres planted in North Dakota for 2014.

The data in this report are based on a survey of wheat producers conducted during June by the North Dakota Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Thank you to each person who supplied data and made this report possible!

The North Dakota Wheat Commission, the North Dakota Ag Experiment Station, and the North Dakota State Seed Department provided funding for this survey. The North Dakota State University (NDSU) Extension Service provided variety descriptions. Access to this report is available for free online at www.ndwheat.com or www.nass.usda.gov/nd/ For further questions, please contact the North Dakota Wheat Commission at (701)328-5111 or NASS at (701) 239-5306.