South Dakotans learn how to build rain gardens to reduce runoff, pollutants

FF Editor
Farm Forum

#td_uid_7_5b58852f3d25b .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item1 {

background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/18-37-22293861-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat;

}

#td_uid_7_5b58852f3d25b .td-doubleSlider-2 .td-item2 {

background: url(https://www.farmforum.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/18-71-22293860-80x60.jpg) 0 0 no-repeat;

}

1 of 2

SDSU Extension

BROOKINGS — South Dakotans received education and training in the design and construction of rain gardens to reduce runoff and filter pollutants thanks to workshops hosted this spring by SDSU Extension in partnership with Dakota Rural Action.

“The workshops were designed to give participants the tools necessary to build a rain garden of their own,” explained David Kringen, SDSU Extension water resources field specialist.

During the spring workshops, attendees learned about the impacts of urban stormwater runoff on water quality and gained the skills necessary to construct their own rain garden.

A rain garden is a shallow, landscaped depression that temporarily holds water runoff from impervious surfaces, such as rooftops, driveways and parking lots.

The water held in a rain garden slowly infiltrates into the soil profile, while at the same time removes pollutants.

“Rain gardens are typically used as urban stormwater best management practices to reduce rainfall runoff that would otherwise be collected in a stormwater system,” said John McMaine, assistant professor and SDSU Extension water management engineer.

McMaine further explained, that depending on what plants are selected, rain gardens can also be used for pollinator habitat and shelter.

During the workshops, participants broke into teams to design rain gardens. Following the workshops, SDSU Extension staff and volunteers from Dakota Rural Action implemented elements from the teams’ designs and built a rain garden in Sioux Falls.

SDSU Extension will lead a post-construction tour of this rain garden early fall 2018.

The project had partial funding support through an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 319 Information and Education mini-grant.

To learn more about rain gardens, contact McMaine at john.mcmaine@sdstate.edu . To learn more about stormwater management visit this iGrow link: http://igrow.org/community-development/communities/urbanization-and-stormwater-management/.

SDSU Extension staff and volunteers from Dakota Rural Action build a rain garden in Sioux Falls. A rain garden is a shallow, landscaped depression that temporarily holds water runoff from impervious surfaces, such as rooftops, driveways and parking lots. iGrow photo
South Dakotans received education and training in the construction of rain gardens to reduce runoff and filter pollutants thanks to workshops hosted this spring by SDSU Extension in partnership with Dakota Rural Action. During the workshops, participants broke into teams to design rain gardens. Following the workshops, SDSU Extension staff and volunteers from Dakota Rural Action implemented elements from the teams’ designs to build a rain garden in Sioux Falls. iGrow photo